Quote:

"Elvis Presley is the greatest cultural force in the 20th century."

(Leonard Bernstein)


Quote:

"If you're an Elvis fan, no explanation is necessary; If you're not an Elvis fan, no explanation is possible."

(George Klein)


Quote:

"For a dead man, Elvis Presley is awfully noisy."

(Professor Gilbert B. Rodman)


 

Quote:

"Absolute id crashed into absolute superego...as the uptightset man in America shook hands with just about the loosest."

(Mark Feeney on the 'Elvis meets Nixon' meeting)


Quote:

"Elvis is everywhere"

(Mojo Nixon & Skid Roper)


Quote:

"...especially in the South, they talk about Elvis and Jesus in the same breath"

(Michael Ventura, LA Weekly)


Quote:

"The image is one thing and the human being is another...it's very hard to live up to an image"

 

(Elvis Presley, Madison Square Garden press conference, 1972)


Quote:

"Elvis was a major hero of mine. I was actually stupid enough to believe that having the same birthday as him actually meant something"

(David Bowie)


Quote:

"No-one, but no-one, is his equal, or ever will be. He was, and is supreme"

(Mick Jagger)


Quote:

"I wasn't just a fan, I was his brother...there'll never be another like that soul brother"

(Soul legend, James Brown)


Quote:

"Before Elvis there was nothing!"

(John Lennon)


Quote:

"There were rock 'n' roll records before Heartbreak Hotel, but this was the one that didn't just open the door…it literally blasted the door off its rusted, rotten, anachronistic hinges...producing, no propelling, a fundamental, primordial and unstoppable shift in not only musical, but social, political and cultural history"

(JNP, BBC website)


Quote:

"Elvis, the musician, is largely a relic belonging to the baby boomer generation...Elvis, the icon, is arguably one of the most potent symbols of popular culture"

( Dr. John Walker)


Quote:

"It [rock & roll] was always about Elvis; not just because he was Elvis, but because he was the big star"

(Bono from U2)


Quote:

"If they had let me on white radio stations back then, there never would have been an Elvis"

(Little Richard)


Quote:

"Elvis loved opera, and he especially liked Mario Lanza. He would watch The Student Prince which was set in Heidelberg, over and over again. He loved the power of the big voices. And he loved big orchestras. He liked real dramatic things"

(Marty Lacker in 'Elvis and the Memphis Mafia')


Quote:

"If life was fair, Elvis would be alive and all the impersonators would be dead"

(Johnny Carson)


Elvis' #1 Pop Singles on Cashbox, USA:

Heartbreak Hotel (1956)

Don't Be Cruel (1956)

Hound Dog (1956)

Love Me Tender (1956)

Too Much (1957)

All Shook Up (1957)

Teddy Bear (1957)

Jailhouse Rock (1957)

Don't (1958)

Stuck On You (1960)

It's Now Or Never (1960)

Are You Lonesome Tonight? (1960)

Surrender (1961)

Good Luck Charm (1962)

Return To Sender (1962)

In The Ghetto (1969)

Suspicious Minds (1969)

Burning Love (1972)

(The Cashbox chart is now defunct)


Elvis Facts:

Elvis was 5' 11" tall

 

Elvis' natural hair color was dark blond

 

Elvis' blood type was O Positive

 

Elvis' shoe size was 11D

 

One of Elvis'( maternal) ancestors, Morning White Dove (born 1800, died 1835), was a full-blooded Cherokee Indian

 

Elvis' uncle, Noah Presley, became Mayor of East Tupelo on January 7, 1936

 

The Presley family moved to Memphis on November 6, 1948

 

Elvis was issued a Social Security card in September 1950 with the # 409-52-2002

 

In 1954 some of the shows played by Elvis & The Blue Moon Boys were at the Overton Park Shell; the Bel-Air Club; Sleepy-Eyed John's Eagle's Nest Club and the Louisiana Hayride

 

Elvis' first manager was Scotty Moore, then Bob Neal, before signing with Colonel Tom Parker

 

The first DJ to play an Elvis record was Fred Cook (WREC), not Dewey Phillips (WHBQ). However, Dewey had the distinction of being the first DJ to play an Elvis record in its entirety

 

Elvis once dated famous stripper, Tempest Storm

 

Elvis was filmed from the waist up only during his 3rd and final appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show

 

In the 50s Elvis was friendly with rising stars, Natalie Wood, Robert Wagner and Ty (Bronco Lane) Hardin

 

Gladys Presley was 46 years old when she died, not 42, as many books suggest

 

The Roustabout album sold 450,000 copies on its initial release, 150,000 copies more than any of the preceding three soundtrack LPs. It was Elvis' last "soundtrack" album to reach #1 on the major album charts in the US

 

Elvis received $1m for filming Harum Scarum (aka Harum Holiday). The film grossed around $2m in the US

 

Elvis and Priscilla married on May 1, 1967

 

They were officially divorced on October 9, 1973

 

Elvis earns nearly $3.5m in 1968 and pays just over $1.4m in income tax

 

Elvis' return to live performing in Las Vegas on July 31, 1969 was in front of an "by invitation only" audience. Stars in attendance included Wayne Newton, Petula Clark, Shirley Bassey, Burt Bacharach and Angie Dickinson

 

On January 9, 1971, the national Junior Chamber of Commerce (Jaycees) announced Elvis as one of "The Top Ten Young Men of the Year". Elvis spoke at the official awards ceremony on January 16

 

"Elvis: Aloha From Hawai" made entertainment history on January 14, 1973, when it was beamed around the world by satellite. In the Philippines it drew 91% of the audience, in Hong Kong 70%. The viewing audience was estimated at more than 1 billion

 

For his 4 week Hilton Vegas season in August 1973 Elvis received $610,000

Sales of Elvis' 1973 album, Raised On Rock, were less than 200,000 units on its initial release

 

Elvis paid $2,959,000 in income tax in 1973

 

In December 1976 Elvis was sworn in as a special deputy sheriff of Shelby County (Memphis) by Sheriff Gene Barksdale

 

Elvis' final live concert was in Indianapolis on June 26, 1977

When Elvis died, he and his father Vernon, were embroiled in an FBI investigation called Operation Fountain Pen

More than 1,500 books have been published about The King in more than 30 languages

 

At Dec 2005 Elvis' biggest selling album in the US is the budget priced, Elvis' Christmas Album, with accredited sales of 9 million units (fingers crossed it reaches 10 million to give Elvis his first "Diamond" award)

 

By early2006, Sony BMG's "collectors label", Follow That Dream, had released more than 50 Elvis CDs

 

During the 1980s, tour guides at Graceland stated that Elvis' biggest selling album (globally) was Moody Blue, with sales exceeding 14 million

 

While Sony BMG estimates Elvis' global sales exceed 1 billion, the company is unable to substantiate this figure. Accredited sales worldwide are estimated to be less than 400 million

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Celluloid Elvis

In this section EIN takes a varied look at Elvis' film career & films about The King

 

Visit "June 2006 is Elvis Film Month" on EIN

News/Articles

(scroll down for more "Reviews")

 

2014

Box office news for The Identical: According to Variety (last weekend) ......Newcomer “The Identical” earned an estimated $534,000 on Friday. The Christian Elvis musical drama from Freestyle Releasing looks to open to $2 million this weekend. The pic, which cost a reported $16 million to produce, could be the lowest-grossing opener for a wide release.

On Monday 8 Sep, Box Office Mojo reported that the film had ranked at #11 on the weekend box office chart with a take of only $1,911,000. (News, Source: Variety/Box Office Mojo, 7-8 Sep 2014)

Click here for more news of Elvis related films


Poor Reviews for 'The Identical' Elvis Movie: The reviews are coming in for the new movie 'The Identical' the story of which parallels Elvis' own life. 'The Identical," which features over 20 original songs (NOT Elvis songs), is now in the US cinemas and the reviews are not good....
.. What if Elvis Presley's stillborn twin brother had survived, only for the two infants to be separated at birth? How might their lives differ, reflect one another and perhaps even intersect? That's the intriguing premise behind the Elvis-inspired faith-based drama "The Identical," which nominally tells the story of Drexel "The Dream" Hemsley and his long-lost twin, Ryan Wade (both played by Blake Rayne).
According to film critics, however, "The Identical" is bogged down by its mawkish execution and lack of originality.
In a review for The Times, Robert Abele writes, "Director Dustin Marcellino and writer Howard Klausner steer their parallel-fates movie toward every cliche, and the aggressive wholesomeness — including avoidance of anything potentially grim about race relations in the Deep South of the '50s and '60s — undercuts the emotion behind their tale of following one's God-given talent."
The movie, Abele says, "is ultimately too schematically sentimental … to have much of an impact."
USA Today's Claudia Puig calls "The Identical" a "contrived twins-separated-at-birth movie." The idea for the film "might have made for a mildly intriguing skit, but blown out into a full-length feature it's at best campy and at worst an amateurish, sentimental schlock-fest. The casting is off-base, and for a
movie about the love of music, the original tunes are thoroughly forgettable."
Regarding the cast, Puig says that even the great Ray Liotta "overacts" in his role as Ryan's stern preacher father and Ashley Judd "dully plays" his mother, while the narration is "heavy-handed" and "clunky."

Please email EIN if YOU have seen the film, As an Elvis fan please tell us your opinion. 
(News, Source;ElvisInfoNet)

Filmmaker back in US to finish "Orion" film documentary: British filmmaker Jeannie Finlay is back in the US to film the remaining part of her upcoming film bio on Jimmy Ellis, aka the masked singer "Orion". Ms Finlay's film is "Orion: The Man Who Would Be King".

In 2014, Jimmy Ellis (Orion) remains the one true superstar of the profession variously referred to as Elvis tribute artists, impersonators or sound-a-likes.

About the film: Nottingham-based filmmaker Jeanie Finlay's fifth feature film, Orion: The Man Who Would Be King tells the story of Jimmy Ellis, an unknown singer who was plucked from obscurity and adopted into a crazy scheme to pose as a masked Elvis look-alike in the wake of the King's death, giving birth to the "Elvis is alive" myth.

 

Starting with the creation of an outlandish fictional identity and concluding with the most tragic of endings, Finlay has documented a truly remarkable story, but before she can release her account of the rise and fall of this legendary masked figure, she needs help with the financial backing of the project and has taken to Indiegogo to crowd fund the project.

Excerpts from Jeanie Finlay's interview with Uni2 Know:

Uni2 Know: Where were some of the most interesting places the filming of the Orion movie took you?

JF: "It was really amazing to walk around Sun Records Studios, to see where the records were actually recorded, to see the master tapes and to stand in Shelby Singleton's office (the producer that discovered and created Orion). We also went to the house where Orion grew up as a boy and his son took me to the place that he was murdered, and that was incredible. Moving and terrible of course, but it gave an incredible sense of the history of the story coming to life."

Uni2 Know: Did any of interviewees for Orion particularly stand out?

JF: "I had a rule that everyone I interviewed in the film had to be connected to Orion is some way. I interviewed his band mates, the fan club manager and we interviewed his road manager at Vernon Presley's house (Elvis’ dad) round the back of Graceland. But some interviews had more of an impact on me than others. For his son - who was still massively grieving from his father's brutal murder - to take us to the place his father was killed was extraordinary, and I consider it a real privilege that he took the time to explain to us what that felt like." (News, Source: Jeanie Finlay/uni-2.co.uk)

Visit the Orion film site

Watch the film trailer

Read EIN's recent article on the amazing and ultimately very tragic life of Jimmy Ellis


The Memphis Flash Blog - Understanding Elvis' Film Career: There are a multitude of very good reasons to check out this great blog! Not only is it filled with interesting interviews and articles, but its latest interview, Understanding Elvis, is a candid discussion with EIN's Nigel Patterson about Elvis' film career.

The comprehensive interview covers a broad range of issues from the myth that all Elvis films are the same and the online course New Perspectives on Elvis Cinema to the history of EIN and the role a new paradigm in marketing played in preventing Elvis from achieving his dream of becoming a respected dramatic actor.

The Blog is available in a number of languages and other great posts include Mixing Elvis Presley: Interview with Michael Brauer (Madison Square Garden recordings) and Alwin Bressler or Elvis Presley's German Ancestors (7 July 2014)


Hollywood veteran Michael Hoey talks to EIN: Michael Hoey is a Hollywood veteran who has worked alongside some of Tinseltown's biggest names, including Elvis. His latest book is Elvis' Favorite Director: The Amazing 52-Year Career of Norman Taurog. Michael recently spoke to EIN about his new book shedding light on a range of interesting subjects including:

  • Elvis as an actor
  • the 'Elvis formula' film
  • were Elvis films 'B' films?
  • what Elvis thought of his "more adult image" in his final narrative films
  • Elvis' relationship with the Colonel
  • how Hollywood has changed since its Golden Era
  • the use and impact of CGI in contemporary films
  • producer Hal Wallis
  • and of course "Elvis' Favorite Director" Norman Taurog

Read Michael Hoey's new interview with EIN


(Book Review): Elvis' Favorite Director: The Amazing 52-Year Career of Norman Taurog: Michael Hoey's latest book is a cracker! Hoey has crafted a finely tuned narrative balance between three core elements: Elvis, director Norman Taurog and the glitter of Hollywood.

Glorious chapters of in-depth discussion and fascinating minutiae about Elvis films are interspersed with equally fascinating chapters bringing to life the excitement and glamour of both Hollywood (from its early days of silent movies to the late 1960s) and many of its most famous stars. 

Click HERE to come behind the scenes as EIN's Nigel Patterson explores the treasures on offer in what is a thoroughly fascinating and engrossing read!

(Book Review, Source: ElvisInfoNet)


'Elvis Films FAQ' Book Review: Elvis' Hollywood years are full of mystery, and supposedly 'Elvis Films FAQ' covers them all! Elvis Films FAQ by author Paul Simpson explores his best and worst moments as an actor, analyses the bizarre autobiographical detail that runs through so many of his films, and reflects on what it must be like to be idolized by millions around the world yet have to make a living singing about dogs, chambers of commerce, and fatally naive shrimps.
After all if Elvis Presley had not wanted to be a movie star, he would never have single-handedly revolutionized popular culture.
Yet this aspect of his phenomenal career has been much maligned and misunderstood – partly because the King himself once referred to his 33 movies as a rut he had got stuck in just off Hollywood Boulevard.

It is a mightly entertaining book - but go here as EIN's Piers Beagley investigates to see whether this new book by author Paul Simpson really answers all the questions you need to know ....

(Book Reviews, Source;ElvisInfoNet)


Interview with 'Elvis Films FAQ' author Paul Simpson: "Elvis Films FAQ" was reviewed by EIN as one of the best Elvis books published in 2013... "Paul Simpson examines every angle of Elvis’ film career and writes about it in a very engaging and enjoyable style. The real triumph of this book is that it will make you want to watch all of Elvis’ films one more time! Highly recommended."

While Elvis' Hollywood years are full of mystery, and Elvis Films FAQ covers them all! Elvis Films FAQ explains everything you want to know about the whys and wherefores of the singer-actor's bizarre celluloid odyssey; or, as Elvis said, "I saw the movie and I was the hero of the movie."
 
"Elvis Films FAQ" was without doubt one of the best Elvis books published in 2013 and EIN wanted to know more from its author Paul Simpson.
 
(Interviews, Source;ElvisInfoNet)
   

2011

EIN Exclusive interview with John Scheinfeld director of  'Fame & Fortune': The new film 'Fame & Fortune' is based on the book, 'Elvis: Still Taking Care of Business' the biography of Sonny West. Emmy and Grammy nominee John Scheinfeld has been chosen as the film's director. John Scheinfeld has previously written and directed some critically acclaimed films about John Lennon, Harry Nilsson, Beach Boys' Brian Wilson and many others.
For Elvis fans this is good news since the film is going to be a serious drama about this extraordinary friendship between two men, rather than the usual disappointing Elvis telemovie.
In this exclusive interview EIN's Piers Beagley talks with director John Scheinfeld about the movie, chosing the cast, EPE involvement, creating a worthy cinematic journey and how he is Taking Care of Business! Go Here.
(Interviews, Source;ElvisInformationNetwork)
   

2010

'Elvis Coming Home' STAR DVD review: The STAR label has just released their ‘ELVIS: Coming Home’ DVD which features an all new mixture with brand new edits of Elvis' songs and videos highlighting the fascinating late-sixties period.

Running 70 minutes and with 25 tracks some of the featured songs include Going Home, Just Call Me Lonesome, Fools Fall in Love, A Little Less Conversation, It Hurts Me, Let Yourself Go, Power of My Love, Tomorrow is A Long Time, Singing Tree, I’m Movin’ On, Come What May, All I Needed Was the Rain, Almost in Love, U.S. Male, Too Much Monkey Business, Stay Away and Almost.

STAR have created NEW video clips using all the Elvis footage available. This includes TV footage, rare photographs, movie clips and personal Home Videos. 

EIN's Piers Beagley explores this new release and discovers some true creativity, fun and sexiness along the way,, Go here to the handsome 'US Male!'

(Celluloid Review, Source;EIN)

EIN Spotlight on 'Girl Happy': Elvis’ 17th movie Girl Happy was made solely to generate revenue. There was no artistic intent on behalf of the stars, the producers, the director, the writers and the studio. Its plot only intermittently makes contact with reality. Some sexist attitudes are expressed on the screen and its depiction of college age sexuality is dated.
Such a venture was well beneath the talents of its star, one of the most vital performers in 20th century American popular culture.
So how can anyone like or even love this ridiculous piece of cinematic fluff?

On the 45th anniversary of its release EIN contributor Harley Payette takes a fascinating look at this often unloved film.


(Spotlight, Source;HarleyPayette. May 2010)


Elvis films on TV in India: Vh1 Movies will telecast Elvis Presley every Sunday this summer. 

For the first time ever on Indian television, Presley’s classic movies like GI Blues, King Creole, Blue Hawaii, Fun in Acapulco, Girls! Girls! Girls! and many more, will be telecast for the next 6 weeks, every Sunday at 9pm.

 Presley often referred to as the King of Rock and Roll began his career in 1954 when Sun Records owner Sam Phillips, eager to bring the sound of African American music to a wider audience, saw in Presley the means to realize his ambition. Conscripted into military service in 1958, Presley re-launched his recording career 2 years later with some of his most commercially successful work. He staged a few concerts and in 1973, Presley staged the first ever concert broadcast globally via satellite, titled Aloha from Hawaii, and seen by approximately 1.5 billion viewers. Prescription drug abuse severely compromised his health, and he died suddenly in 1977 at the age of 42. Presley is regarded as one of the most important figures of 20th-century popular culture.  More potential fans for Elvis. (News, Source: Brian Quinn/BusinessofCinema.com, 16 April 2010)

 

Review, Source: Sydney Morning Herald, March 2010

 

2009

Tickle Me: Awful ‘B’ grade film or guilty pleasure?:  EIN takes a brief look back at one of Elvis’ films which met widespread criticism when first released but one that a significant number of fans enjoy.

Tickle Me – the movie: This is the Brisbane Film Group review of Tickle Me

It is not surprising Elvis Presley’s 18th vehicle, Tickle Me (1965), has been on the receiving end of less than positive critical reviews.  Hackneyed plot, cheap studio sets and low bidget are not usually the ingredients of a quality product. But is Tickle Me really that bad? 

Yes, the landscape scenery is obviously cheap and phony and the plot has been done by Hollywood a hundred times before in countless westerns, however any landscape weakness is more than made up for through other scenery, notably the delectable Jocelyn Lane as Pam Meritt (Elvis’ initially reluctant love interest) who exudes an overt feminine sexuality well matching that of the film’s principal star. 

Ms Lane has to rival the equally delectable Ann-Margret, Michele Carey (Live A Little, Love A Little) and Ina Balin (Charro) as Elvis’s sexiest co-star!

Elvis as singing rodeo star, Lonnie Beale, who moonlights in his spare time at a beauty ranch for rich and bored women is hardly inspiring and by the second half of the film, the humour has slid into slapstick territory.  That the two writers, Elwood Ullman and Edward Bernds, are better known for their work on films for acts such as The Three Stooges, is a strong indicator of what the studio wanted for this Presley vehicle. This is not all bad news though.

The supporting cast is solid without being outstanding.  The inclusion of Hollywood veterans Julie Adams and western star Bill Williams mixed with other familiar faces including Mullaney and Will Hutchins (TV’s Sugarfoot and who would later play Elvis’ sidekick in the Prince and the Pauper take off in another much maligned but underrated film, Clambake) helps keep the film afloat.

The script, which is deliberately “B’ grade is actually not that bad and at times downright hilarious (if silly), particularly scenes in the hands of Jack Mullaney who is wonderfully cast as the hapless Stanley Potter and Edward Faulkner as the self-absorbed but well meaning Brad Bentley. Thanks to the professionalism of the cast some scenes with very ordinary lines of dialogue actually work:

Estelle Penfield: You've got to be kidding me
Lonnie Beale: [shrugs] Sorry, dietician's orders.
Estelle Penfield: But it's such a little steak, and I'm so hungry. Listen, Lonnie, if you would give me another steak, I would be very grateful. Do we understand each other?
Lonnie Beale: [pauses] No.

The soundtrack to Tickle Me is actually one of the King’s strongest with all 9 songs taken from his back catalogue, notably several tracks from his critically lauded album, Elvis Is Back

As legend has it, Tickle Me, gave Allied Artists at least a temporary reprieve from going into receivership.  For me, there are much worse Elvis films than this one.  Paradise, Hawaiian Style and Harum Scarum spring immediately to mind.

Overall, Tickle Me is a fun movie to while away 90 minutes of one’s time.  The music is good, there are silly but funny moments, and the scenery of the primary male and female stars is more than attractive. This film is not as bad as some critics suggest!  Tickle Me has no pretensions to be anything other than what it is.  Enjoy it on this basis.

 

Tickle Me – the soundtrack: In his book, Elvis Presley The Complete Guide to His Music (Omnibus Press, 2004), author John Robertson wrote this about the Tickle Me soundtrack:

Rodeos, buried treasure, ghosts – all in the same forgettable movie. Tickle Me was Elvis’s first film for Allied artists, and also his last.  It was memorable for quite another reason, though: for the only time, no new songs were prepared for the soundtrack.  Instead, nine previously released recordings were introduced into the plot, among them such highlights of 1960’s Elvis Is Back LP as “Dirty, Dirty Feeling; and It Feels So Right;RCA included five of the songs on a soundtrack EP, then bowed to public demand in Britain and slapped the four leftovers onto a second extended-play single.  But all tracks are now available on other CDs. (Dec 2009)

Read EIN's review of the FTD Tickle Me release


Red West film receives runner up film award: The Southeastern Film Critics Association - an organization whose members represent electronic and print media outlets (including The Commercial Appeal) in nine states - this week named "Up in the Air" the best movie of 2009. The film, a comic drama that stars George Clooney as a man who is hired by companies to fly around the country and fire employees, is set to open Wednesday in Memphis

"Up in the Air" also earned a Best Actor award for Clooney and a Best Adapted Screenplay award for Justin Reitman and Sheldon Turner (working from Walter Kirn's novel). But the Southern critics otherwise spread the wealth: No other movie earned more than one award.

The association's special award, the Wyatt Award (named for Nashville Tennessean film critic Gene Wyatt, who died in 2004), went to "That Evening Sun," which screened Oct. 8 at the Indie Memphis Film Festival. Directed by Scott Teems, "That Evening Sun" stars Hal Holbrook as a stubborn octogenarian who leaves a retirement facility to move back to his rural Tennessee home even after it has been occupied by a new family.

The Wyatt runner-up was "Goodbye Solo," which stars former longtime Memphian and Elvis associate Red West as a North Carolina man planning his suicide. In its fifth year, the Wyatt honors the film that "best embodies the essence of the South." Past Wyatt winners include "Junebug"; "Dixie Chicks: Shut Up and Sing"; "Waitress"; and "Shotgun Stories."

This year, 44 members voted in the Southeastern Film Critics Association poll. For a complete list of winners, visit gomemphis.com. (News, Source: John Beifuss, The Commercial Appeal)


King 'n' Me - new Elvis related film released: Plotline - An eccentric millionaire [Michael Jacobs] sends a seasoned documentary film crew on a search to find the most legendary icon in the history of rock 'n' roll...The King. Is he alive, as many believe? If so, does he want to be found? Is there any credibility to the often ridiculous tales of "sightings"?

With an angry, alcoholic Director [Rob Ashkenas], a spoiled, egomaniacal celebrity journalist [Michael Dasch], and a ragtag crew of half-wits, the team searches throughout the urban jungles of Southern Florida to answer these questions. What they soon find will not only change their careers, but also their lives.

A tour de force performance by Producer/Co-Writer/Star Mike McSween, Shot & Cut by award winning filmmaker Steven Jacobs, highlight this comedic and transcendent mockumentary about the lengths people will go to find what they're looking for...and discovering themselves in the meantime.


Cast: Mike McSween, Rob Ashkenas, Michael Dasch, Michael Jacobs, 1000 Pounds of Thrust (band)

Visit the "KING 'N' ME" website and order the DVD (2 Oct 2009)




(Online Animation Review) The Elvis and Jack Nicklaus Mysteries: EIN has long said that the key to Elvis’ enduring popularity and is not so much his musical legacy, but his prolific and widespread socio-cultural impact.  From the global proliferation of ETAs (of variable quality), through 1,000 tribute songs and even more Elvis books, to the many films and daily mention of the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll in all forms of our print, audio-visual and online media, Elvis’ impact on the world continues to be evident and perhaps a largely subliminal one.

In the field of animation, The Australian Children’s Foundation produced the entertaining Lil Elvis Jones and the Truckstoppers series and in the US, Jeff Martin has masterminded a sublime 3 episode short animation titled The Elvis and Jack Nicklaus Mysteries.

Released in 2000 this set of 3 short animated features is an absolute delight!  Teaming two of America’s best known icons to form a “Hardy Boys” type duo was a stroke of genius by creator, writer and director, Jeff Martin.

Each episode, developed with production company Icebox, runs for between 4 and 5 minutes.  The visuals are colourfully rich and crisp as is the clear audio track. With great and simple plot lines each episode is a joy to watch with nice balance between its drama and humor.  The online cartoons also feature a great rockabilly theme sung by Chris Anderson over the closing credits.

I’m not going to say anything more about The Elvis and Jack Nicklaus Mysteries except that they are exciting, different and engaging, so WATCH THEM!!!

If only Jeff Martin had produced more for our enjoyment! 

The 3 episodes are:

The Bullet Hole – Elvis goes golfing with the Golden Bear and murder ensues

E Pluribus Murder – who really killed JFK?

Twin Killing - Elvis is framed for a series of crimes and comes face to face with the man he thought was dead

(To watch each episode click the episode title)

Verdict:  Watch ‘The Elvis and Jack Nicklaus Mysteries’ at your own peril. I’m warning you, you will soon be hooked by these sublime, guilty pleasure animations. (5 Sep 2009)

Comment on this review


Quirky film with great Elvis portrayal: Robert Patrick gives one of the best interpretations of Elvis Presley in the movie Lonely Streetsince Bruce Campbell showed The King of Rock ‘n’ Roll as a nursing home resident fighting mummies in Bubba Ho-Tep.

This is the same Patrick who as the cyborg T-1000 terrorized Arnold Schwarzenegger in Terminator 2: Judgment Day, who played Col. Tom Ryan in CBS’ The Unit and who portrayed Johnny Cash’s father in Walk the Line. Patrick regularly pops up in movies and TV as either a villain or iron-jawed tough guys.

But Patrick is unrecognizable as any of his signature roles as Elvis – or rather Mr. Aaron -- in the entertaining Lonely Street(Bridge Home Entertainment, $19.99, 88 minutes running time, Rated: R).

Based on Steve Brewer’s first novel in his Bubba Mabry series, Lonely Streetis a quirky, humorous film that also stays faithful to the spirit of the authors’ amusing series.

Bubba (Jay Mohr, Gary Unmarried) is a down-on-his-luck Albuquerque private investigator who takes just about any job to pay the bills.

In Lonely Street, Bubba may have the job of his life when he is asked to keep tabloid reporter Hank Tankersley away from a client – “Mr. Aaron,” who bears a striking resemblance to Elvis Presley. Mr. Aaron (Patrick) attributes his survival to downing wheat-grass shooters and practicing tai chi while living in New Mexico for more than 30 years.

When Hank is killed, Bubba tries to find out what the reporter was planning to do with his story as well as prove that he had nothing to do with the man’s death. The investigation gives Bubba a primer on the music industry, courtesy the scheming pony-tailed record producer Jerry Finkelman (Joe Mantegna) and leads him to the hooker with an agenda Bambi Gamble (Nikki Cox) and tabloid editor, Felicia Quattlebaum (Lindsay Price, Lipstick Jungle).

Mohr shows Bubba’s humor and slacker mentality as well as his innate desire to do the right thing, so evident in Brewer’s novels. Mantegna gives his usual spot-on performance, getting caught in the absurdity and campiness that pervades Lonely Street.

But it’s Patrick with his limited screen time that steals the show, mumbling like Elvis yet also showing a regal quality that made that boy from Mississippi grow up to be The King. Only Campbell in Bubba Ho-Tep can beat Patrick as Elvis.

The short bonuses on Lonely Street’s DVD include a look at how this independent movie got made – which included luck and creative fundraising that falls just short of putting on bake sales and car washes. Mohr also tells how he and Cox (Las Vegas) were married shortly after filming ended more than two years ago.

There are also production stills set to original songs by Elvis impersonator James Brown and a music video.

Lonely Street will make you remember why Elvis was The King; read Brewer’s novels to find out what Bubba did after his brush with Elvis. (DVD Review, Source: Oline H. Cogdill, Mystery Fiction Columnist, sun-sentinel.com)


Elvis inspired films are a strangely satisfying lot: As we all know of course, Elvis never died. No, none of that ridiculous "he's living with aliens on another planet" conspiracy nonsense. Elvis never really died because he continues to influence the arts, even to this day. Not just in music, but in film as well. Whether he's a sexual deviant, an invisible friend or even a mummy-hunting geriatric, The King lives on in our hearts, minds and movie theaters, and he will for a very long time to come.

"Bubba Ho-Tep" (2002): Might as well hit the ground with guns blazing. The conceit behind Don Coscarelli's "Bubba Ho-Tep" alone is enough to sell it. Elvis (Bruce Campbell!) never died; he simply went into hiding in a Texas nursing home, the same place where an in-hiding John F. Kennedy -- who is apparently a black man, played by Ossie Davis -- is also living out his twilight years. That same nursing home becomes the target of an ancient mummy, which preys on residents as they sit on the crapper. Only the geriatric superpowers of JFK and The King can save the day.

"Honeymoon in Vegas" (1992): Against all odds, "Honeymoon in Vegas" works. On the eve of their Las Vegas wedding, Jack (Nicolas Cage) and Betsy (Sarah Jessica Parker) are caught in a sticky situation: come up with Jack's $65,000 poker debt -- lost in a rigged game, 'natch -- or leave Betsy in the care of dirty-dealing pro gambler Tommy Korman (James Caan) for the weekend. The predictable beats that follow reach their climax when Jack hitches a ride back to Vegas aboard a plane full of skydiving Elvis impersonators in light-up jumpsuits. Sure, Elvis Presley doesn't actually appear as a character in this movie. But I figure that 100 skydiving King impersonators is a mighty close second.

"True Romance" (1993): In Quentin Tarantino's first script, a love story, Clarence Worley (Christian Slater) and Alabama Whitman (Patricia Arquette) try to run away together by selling off a bundle of stolen cocaine. Of course, anytime a large stash of drugs is stolen you can expect large brutes with guns to follow the trailer. Such is the case in "True Romance," as Clarence and Alabama get mixed up in all sorts of trouble. Through all of the madness, the one thing that keeps Clarence together is his imaginary pal Elvis. Whenever the crises reach unmanageable proportions, he ducks away for a chat with The King -- played by Val Kilmer --to get his head straight.

"Forrest Gump" (1994): Little do we all know it, but the world would have been a much different place if a young Elvis Presley hadn't stopped for a night at a little bed and breakfast in Greenbow, Alabama. That's where The King met a young Forrest Gump (Tom Hanks), who taught the future rock star how to shake his hips. That signature dance move inspired millions of young women, angered twice as many parents and was in many ways the keystone of a cultural revolution. All thanks to little Forrest and those damnable leg braces of his.

"Sleeping Dogs Lie" (2006): Elvis plays a minor role in "Sleeping Dogs Lie," a twisted rom-com from the mind of Bobcat Goldthwait. The bulk of the story revolves around Amy (Melinda Page Hamilton), a newly engaged young woman who labors over whether to share a dirty, shameful secret with her husband-to-be: that she... errr... pleasured her dog on a whim one quiet college evening. In an effort to inspire her daughter to be honest -- not knowing what the secret is of course -- Amy's mother relates the story of Elvis once having her and a friend wrestle in his bedroom while he watched. There's also a Roy Orbison anecdote, but he died in December. (Source: moviesblog.mtv.com, 18 Aug 2009)


Filming of Bubba Nosferatu to start by end of 2009: In a recent interview with Fangoria Radio Ron Perlman (Hellboy) gave listeners a pretty big update on the status of Bubba Nosferatu, the sequel to Don Coscarelli’s the brilliant and inspired Bubba Ho-tep. Perlman will be taking over the part of Elvis Presley. The rhinestone jumpsuit was previously worn by veteran B-movie actor Bruce Campbell.

According to Perlman, filming has been tentatively scheduled to start before the end of this year. Perlman told Fangoria, “Well, I have this window that’s about to open…I’ll be done shooting [his cable series] Sons Of Anarchy in September, and we’re hoping to get into production on Bubba in my hiatus between seasons two and three.” Perlman added that he has spoken with both director Coscarelli and co-star Paul Giamatti (Giamatti is set to play Elvis’ infamous manager, Colonel Tom Parker) and everyone is keen to get the ball rolling.

Additionally, according to Fangoria, Angus Scrimm (Phantasm) has been added to the cast. Scrimm will “play a Boris Karloff-like horror star who Elvis meets up with (pre-Ho-tep) in Las Vegas on the set of a vampire movie.”

Planning for Bubba Nosferatu has been going on since the release of Bubba Ho-tep in 2002. The growing anticipation only adds to the pile of concerns many fans have for the next installment of Elvis fighting the supernatural. There is no doubt that Perlman is a great actor, but can he capture the essence of Elvis that Bruce Campbell managed to exude in the first film? Audiences will just have to wait and see.  Visit You Tube to see Bubba Ho-Tep preview


Filming of Bubba Nosferatu to start by end of 2009: In a recent interview with Fangoria Radio Ron Perlman (Hellboy) gave listeners a pretty big update on the status of Bubba Nosferatu, the sequel to Don Coscarelli’s the brilliant and inspired Bubba Ho-tep. Perlman will be taking over the part of Elvis Presley. The rhinestone jumpsuit was previously worn by veteran B-movie actor Bruce Campbell.

According to Perlman, filming has been tentatively scheduled to start before the end of this year. Perlman told Fangoria, “Well, I have this window that’s about to open…I’ll be done shooting [his cable series] Sons Of Anarchy in September, and we’re hoping to get into production on Bubba in my hiatus between seasons two and three.” Perlman added that he has spoken with both director Coscarelli and co-star Paul Giamatti (Giamatti is set to play Elvis’ infamous manager, Colonel Tom Parker) and everyone is keen to get the ball rolling.

Additionally, according to Fangoria, Angus Scrimm (Phantasm) has been added to the cast. Scrimm will “play a Boris Karloff-like horror star who Elvis meets up with (pre-Ho-tep) in Las Vegas on the set of a vampire movie.”

Planning for Bubba Nosferatu has been going on since the release of Bubba Ho-tep in 2002. The growing anticipation only adds to the pile of concerns many fans have for the next installment of Elvis fighting the supernatural. There is no doubt that Perlman is a great actor, but can he capture the essence of Elvis that Bruce Campbell managed to exude in the first film? Audiences will just have to wait and see.  Visit You Tube to see Bubba Ho-Tep preview


Elvis brought to life in new "Lonely Street" film: In what will be its only theatrical booking prior to its DVD release next week on the Echo Bridge Home Entertainment label, "Lonely Street" opens Friday at the Hollywood 20 Cinema, in an attempt to attract the fans who are in town for "Elvis Week."

The movie -- a comic murder mystery that casts Robert Patrick as a healthy, septuagenarian Elvis -- ends its exclusive run on Aug. 16, which marks the 32nd anniversary of Presley's death.

The booking was arranged by John Jerit, whose Bartlett-based American Paper Optics company is one of the nation's largest suppliers of paper 3D glasses. Jerit and his wife, Susan Jerit, are credited as co-executive producers on "Lonely Street" because Jerit was one of the prime investors in the $1.7-million film, which was shot by writer-director Peter Ettinger in New Mexico and on sets in Los Angeles.

The direct-to-DVD route taken by "Lonely Street" seems inevitable. The movie's star (and co-producer) is Jay Mohr, who plays Bubba Mabry, an Albuquerque-by-way-of-Mississippi "two-bit gumshoe" (as he is called in the film) introduced in a series of novels (book cover shown opposite - see DVD review above) by Steve Brewer. (The movie pays homage to Mabry's creater by having the detective visit the "Brewer Library.")

With its bright lighting (even night scenes feature an attractive neon glow) and cast of familiar-faced non-marquee names (former "Ghostbuster" Ernie Hudson; Joe Mantegna as a sleazy record producer; Mohr's wife, Nikki Cox, as a cleavage-exposing cougar newshound), "Lonely Street" plays sort of like an unsold comedy-mystery TV pilot that was retrofitted with profanity and jokes about vomit, flatulence and genitalia in hopes of attracting theatrical interest. The occasional gross-out humor (complete with sound effects) is the worst thing about the film; it's sometimes accompanied by Mohr's often redundant voiceover narration, much of which seems to have written in post-production, in an attempt to spice up the action.

For example, the scene in which Bubba meets his mysterious client is directed to that the audiences shares the sleuth's shock when "Mr. Aaron" is revealed to be Elvis Presley. The narration almost wrecks the scene, however, by telling the audience what it can see with its own eyes; it's like sitting in front of a guy at the movies who says things like "He's got a gun" when a character onscreen draws a gun.

That "Lonely Street" nevertheless emerges as okay sub-Elmore Leonard entertainment is due primarily to Patrick's dignified, respectful interpretation of the 70-something Elvis as a man who's given up drugs and fried foods for wheat grass, Tai Chi and, apparently, inner peace.

An interesting companion piece to another Bubba/Elvis movie, "Bubba Ho-tep," a horror-comedy that cast Bruce Campbell as a senior-citizen Presley, "Lonely Street" finds Elvis contemplating a comeback after faking his death three decades earlier -- a disappearance that enabled him to escape the self-parody of his final years while becoming a bigger star than ever before. "I'm everywhere and nowhere, all at the same time," he says. "People like Elvis again."

Unfortunately, even in "death," Elvis has to cope with intrusive tabloid photographers, so he hires Mabry to watch out for him -- a move that eventually turns both the detective and the King into murder suspects.

Despite being basically unrecognizable in remarkable prosthetic makeup created by Alec Gillis and Tom Woodruff Jr., Patrick is able to put across Elvis' thoughtfulness as well as his humor -- and in a convincing Elvis accent, too. "Jesus, it really is you!" a reporter (Lindsay Price) exclaims after meeting the King. Replies Elvis: "I'm not Jesus, but I appreciate the comparison." (Source: California Chronicle, 7 Aug 2009)

Order the DVD edition of "Lonely Street" from Amazon


Sixth Annual Elvis Film Festival: The countdown has begun! Dust off the blue suede shoes, prepare for the ultimate journey down memory lane and enjoy a day with hundreds of fans from around the world with Malco Theatres’ Elvis Film Festival!

The sixth annual Elvis Film Festival, is scheduled for Tuesday, August 11, 2009 during Elvis Week®, at Studio on the Square in Midtown Memphis. This year’s festival salutes Fun in Acapulco, Roustabout and returning fan favorites Jailhouse Rock and King Creole.

Tickets are $5 each and can be purchased at the theatre box office or online at www.malco.com.
 All proceeds from the festival will benefit the Elvis Presley® Charitable Foundation.
 
Festival Schedule:
Screen #1
10am Jailhouse Rock
12 noon Fun in Acapulco
2pm Roustabout
4:10pm Jailhouse Rock

Screen #4
10:15am Roustabout
12:30pm King Creole
3pm Fun in Acapulco

For additional information, please contact Karen Scott, Malco Theatres Marketing Director, at 901.761.3480 or karen@malco.com.
 
Malco Theatres is headquartered in Memphis, Tennessee and is fourth-generation family-owned and operated. Malco operates over 300 screens in 31 locations across the mid-south.

 


Elvis 101: How to Appreciate an Elvis Movie: In Memphis, the anniversary of Elvis Presley's death on Aug. 16, 1977, has transformed over the years from pilgrimage into a weeklong celebration of the King's life and career.

In Chicago, Facets Multimedia, for nearly 35 years a bastion for film as an art form, is getting into the act with a midnight screening Aug. 8 of "Viva Las Vegas" as part of its Facets Night School cult and genre film series.

Susan Doll (shown opposite), who has a doctorate in film from Northwestern University and is the author of "Elvis for Dummies" and several other books about Presley, will introduce the film with a crash course in "Elvis 101: How to Appreciate an Elvis Movie." In a phone interview, Doll talked about why "Viva Las Vegas" makes the grade.

Q: Why "Viva Las Vegas?"

A: My first choice was "King Creole," but it's summer, and I decided to show one of the musical comedies, something lighthearted. I think the music in this one is really cool. A lot of males come to Facets Night School, and I know that Ann-Margret will be just their ticket. She really matches Elvis shake for shake.


Q: Where do you rank this movie in the Presley canon?
-->

A: It's the high point of the Presley travelogues, which is what he disparagingly called his musical comedies. He would play a race-car driver, or a boat pilot, or an airline pilot, who dropped into some exotic vacation locale and woo the girl.

Q: What will you be talking about before the film?

A: The positive virtues of Elvis' movies. They're universally denigrated, but I'm hoping to redeem them to some degree. I know they're not Academy Award-winners, but until about 1964, they were extremely well-crafted by big-name Hollywood directors. ["Viva Las Vegas" director George Sidney also did "Showboat" and "Annie Get Your Gun."]


Q: How can people best prepare for the screening?

A: The best way would be not to read about Elvis but to watch Elvis. I would recommend (the documentary) "Elvis '56." All you have to do is see that footage of Perry Como from the same period, and it's no wonder Elvis knocked people's socks off. And watch one of his films from the '50s, like "Loving You," "King Creole" or "Jailhouse Rock."


Q: Will there be a test afterward?


A: No, but there will be a drawing and a giveaway.

Log on to facets.org for the Facets Night School schedule.
(Celluloid Elvis, Source: Donald Liebenson, Chicago Tribune


"Tales from the Catholic Church of Elvis!" Film Debut Garners Six Nominations, Best Lead Actress Win: The first screening of the just-completed controversial Catholic Church/Sin City-themed independent film "Tales from the Catholic Church of Elvis!" garnered an unprecedented six nominations, including one for Best Feature, at the Gala Awards ceremony held Thursday night, June 4, 2009 at Hoboken International Film Festival ("HIFF") in New Jersey, with Mercy Malick, who also wrote and co-directed, winning Best Actress for her multi-role portrayal of true-life experiences growing up as a Catholic school girl in Las Vegas.

In addition to Malick's Best Actress Award, the film's outstanding cast also earned a Best Supporting Actor nomination for Emmy-winner Larry Gelman's portrayal of the lecherous octogenarian amputee "Sydney", and a Best Supporting Actress nomination for Tim Robbins' "The Actors' Gang" veteran Mary Eileen O'Donnell's portrayal of the street-wise, rosary-beads and brass-knuckle-toting nun, "Sister MacDonald". "Tales" also earned nominations for Best Screenplay, and Best Editing.

"We finished the film just in time to next-day-air it to HIFF," reports Malick. "Our screening there last Monday was literally the first time we had seen it outside of the editing room. And then to experience a theater full of complete strangers reacting the way they did- it was just a high I can't describe."

Seventy-two admitted films competed for awards at HIFF, and "…we saw some incredible stuff! Just absolutely superior filmmaking," says Malick. "The HIFF organizers and staff could not have possibly treated us better, and to be so profusely honored in that competitive pool, all I can say is, YEAH!"

After its tremendously successful East Coast debut at Hoboken, "Tales" will premiere next week on the West Coast at Seattle's True Independent Film Festival ("STIFF"), where it will screen Wednesday night, June 10th, 9:30 PM, at the Northwest Film Forum. For up-to-date screening information, please visit www.CCofE.com. (Celluloid Elvis, Source: PRweb - emediawire, 7 June 2009)


Red West's new film in Sydney Film Festival this week: Australia's prestigious Sydney Film festival is featuring Red West's outstanding new film 'Goodbye Solo' this week. Having received rave reviews in the USA the film gets its Australian premiere in Sydney at Thursday June 4th 6.30pm with a repeat showing June 9th 2.10pm at the fabulous art-deco State Theatre.
Reviewed as.. "Two actors. One from Africa. The other who was a bodyguard for Elvis. Who but Director Ramin Bahrani would find these men and pair them in a story of heartbreaking depth and power? Bahrani is the new great American director. He never steps wrong. In "Goodbye Solo," he begins with a situation that might unfold in a dozen different ways and makes of it something original and profound. It is about the desire to help and the desire to not be helped.
We are not speaking of an odd couple here. We're speaking of human nature. You can't learn acting like this. Bahrani worked with the actors for months. Savane drove a taxi in Winston-Salem. Red West spent a lifetime rehearsing. Although this is an independent film in its heart and soul, it is a classical film in its style.
It is as pure as something by John Ford. A film like this makes me wonder if we are coming to the end of the facile, snarky indie films. We live in desperate times. Wherever you live, when this film opens, it will be the best film in town."
Don't miss it. Go here for info and tickets. (News, Source;EIN, 2 June 2009)

New Red West film (News, Source: Shane)


Impello Films Begins Pre-Production of Next Feature Film, Restoring My Father's Honor: Elvis’ youngest step-brother, David Stanley, has commenced work on his next feature film. 

Stanley released his first feature film, Protecting the King, his story of growing up around Elvis in 2007.  Restoring My Father’s Honor has a compelling primary theme and is likely to prove controversial!

From the media release: From writer, producer, director D. Edward Stanley who captured international interest at his Cannes premier and later through the worldwide release of Protecting The King in 2007, comes a true story that has been buried for more than fifty years. Restoring My Father’s Honor follows

Stanley’s father, Master Sgt. William J. Stanley as he fights his way through D-Day on bloody Omaha Beach only to face an enemy in the form of Vernon Presley, father of Rock icon Elvis Presley.

Impello Films Inc. announced today (3 Oct 2008) it has begun pre-production work on its next feature film “Restoring My Father’s Honor.” With his first feature film “Protecting The King” released worldwide in 2007, writer/producer/director D. Edward Stanley now brings a true story to the screen that has been buried for more than 50 years.

In 1958 Master Sgt. William (Bill) J. Stanley, 3rd Armored Division, was stationed in Frankfurt Germany with his wife and three young sons. That same year Vernon Presley followed his son Elvis Presley, now an Army private also assigned to the 3rd Armored Division, to Frankfurt. In a twist of fate these two men would meet, setting off a series of events that would lead to deceit, dishonor and betrayal. Sgt. Stanley had known only victory in 17 years of military service. From the bloody beaches of Normandy France in 1944 to the carnage of the Korean War, he was a combat soldier with medals that gave silent testimony to his honor and courage. But the day Vernon Presley arrived in Frankfurt, the groundwork was laid for a battle not of guns, tanks and military strategy but of greed, power and money.

Sgt. Stanley would unknowingly be drawn into a battle he didn’t know how to win – a battle that would not only cost him his family, but the honor of the country that he had dedicated his life to defend. “Sgt. Stanley was my father,” said D. Edward Stanley. “I never really got to know my Dad until after his death when I received his memoirs in the mail. I grew up at Graceland as the step-brother of Elvis Presley. The story of what happened to him and how it impacted his life has never been told. And it’s certainly an unknown chapter of the Presley saga.”

“Restoring My Father’s Honor” promises to reach a broad range of audiences with its human drama, military flavor and compelling content. “It’s the story of a combat veteran who fought in some of this nation’s greatest crusades for freedom yet became a casualty of fame,” said Stanley. “But it’s also a story of redemption and restoration.” For more information about Restoring My Father’s Honor visit the films official website at www.restoringmyfathershonor.com.

Impello Films engages in the production and development of the intellectual properties of writer/director D. Edward Stanley as well as other acquired properties for exploitation in various media and markets. The production company’s offices are located at 9131 Jasmine Lane, Irving, Texas 75068. For more information about Impello Films visit www.impellofilms.com (14 May 2009)

Restoring My Father’s Honor website: http://www.restoringmyfathershonor.com/

Read EIN’s review of Protecting the King


Elvis Film Fest #6: Tickets go on sale today at www.malco.com for Elvis Film Fest 6!

Advance Ticketing Instructions:
visit www.malco.com and click on online tickets, click on studio on the square and change the calendar date to August 11, available tickets will show up on screen.

We’re looking forward to seeing everyone this summer!

Please feel free to forward this information to your friends...and if you have a moment, find us on Facebook!

See you in August-
Karen
--
Karen Scott
Sales & Marketing Coordinator
Malco Theatres, Inc
5851 Ridgeway Center Parkway
Memphis, Tennessee 38120
901/761.3480
901/681.2044 fax
karen@malco.com
www.malco.com


Faye Dunaway vs. Elvis-loving zombie in new movie 'Flick': Hundreds of movies currently are making the rounds of domestic and international film festivals, but it's safe to say only one of them showcases Faye Dunaway in the role of a one-armed police detective from Memphis battling an Elvis-loving rockabilly zombie in Wales.
Written and directed by British horror enthusiast David Howard, "Flick" is the story of a vengeful undead Teddy Boy named Johnny Taylor (Hugh O'Conor), who is nicknamed "Flick" for his "flick knife" switchblade style. He is restored to life by the sound of the vintage rockabilly tune "Jilted Again" after the Hillman Minx automobile he drove off a dock in 1960 is pulled from the watery depths in the present day.
Coincidentally, Johnny's killing spree begins while a Memphis detective named McKenzie (Faye Dunaway) is in town as part of a police exchange with Welsh sister city Hobbs End.
"I'm from Memphis -- home of the King of Rock 'n' Roll," she growls. "I spread bigger men than you on my muffins for breakfast."
"Music was the direct inspiration for the film," said Howard, noting that the role of the Memphis detective was written specifically for Dunaway, an Oscar-winner for "Network" and an Oscar nominee for "Chinatown" and "Bonnie and Clyde."
"We knew Faye was a Southern girl (from Florida)," Howard said, "and it just felt a natural fit to draw on her own origins, the whole Southern-belle-with-a-twist

thing. Maybe as a teen-ager she danced to music from the halcyon days of Sun Records at her own school prom ... It's a nice thought.
Howard who has visited Memphis and Graceland said rock music and horror movies are pop-culture blood brothers because "the confusion, fear, anger, loathing and changes ... between childhood and adolescence can seem quite horrific, and nothing expresses mood and emotion more effectively than music. It's not difficult to see why rock and roll was seen as dangerous and heretical to the parents of 1950s teen-agers."
As for Elvis, who is referenced throughout "Flick","In the UK, the music of Elvis continues to endure... His is a cult that continues to grow and his fans, of all ages, remain legion."
(News, Source;EIN, April 2009)

Elvis in 'Killshot' and other Movie soundtracks: Elvis is featured in the movie "Killshot" starring Mickey Rourke, Diane Lane and Thomas Jane. One character (played by Rosario Dawson) is an Elvis fan and Elvis is mentioned several times. On the soundtrack are three Elvis songs: "Suspicion", "Doin' The Best I Can" and "It Hurts Me". After a limited theatrical release, the film has been released on DVD in US and other countries all over the world.
"Burning Love" is on the soundtrack of "Ghosts of Girlfriends Past" (starring Matthew McConaughey, Jennifer Garner, Michael Douglas) and "I Got a Woman" on "He's Just Not That Into You" (starring Jennifer Aniston, Jennifer Connelly, Scarlett Johansson & Drew Barrymore).


(News, Source:ElvisNews, April 2009)


Blue Hawaii - the movie: Blue Hawaii is the movie that Elvis fans hate to love, although it is one of Elvis' most successful films. After the 1960 dramas of Flaming Star and Wild In The Country, Blue Hawaii was a return to the musical fluff first seen in GI Blues. While Elvis craved dramatic interest and acting challenges the general public thought otherwise. Nearly 50 years on, EIN contributor Harley Payette takes an in-depth look at Blue Hawaii and wonders if this film really was the beginning of the end - or perhaps first class family entertainment. See if you agree. - - Click here for the review plus some great Hawaii photos

(Source;EIN/Harley Payette, March 2009)


John Carpenter and Kurt Russell's Elvis the Movie -- Where's the DVD?: In 1979, two years after the tragic, untimely death of the King of Rock and Roll, Dick Clark sanctioned a 3-hour TV biopic, entitled simply, Elvis.  Director John Carpenter, a lifelong Elvis fan, red hot after the success of Halloween, was hired to helm the film.  After lengthy auditions, Kurt Russell was cast as Presley and it would be this film that cemented his transition from juvenile Disney fare to more adult roles.  Carpenter and Russell, would, of course, go on to make many more films together, including Escape From New York and The Thing.
When it was originally broadcast, it was one of the highest rated TV movies ever, even outdrawing Gone With the Wind, shown opposite its premiere.  While a two-hour edited version was released on VHS in the early 90's, it has since gone into moratorium. So ... where's the DVD?
Given the pedigree of not only its subject matter, but its now famous makers, it seems a no-brainer to release this on disc.  Especially since the Elvis mini-series from a few years ago, starring Jonathan Rhys-Myers could not hold a candle to the Carpenter-Russell collaboration.  This despite the fact that the Elvis Presley Estate offered the use of Elvis' music.  The 1979 version used country singer Ronnie McDowell to sing the songs, eerily dead-on.
After contacting Dick Clark Productions waaaay back in 2003 regarding a DVD release, I was told plans were underway, but that some of the music was held up in copyright redtape (specifically the Bill Monroe estate, over the rights to Blue Moon of Kentucky, prominently featured in a major set piece).  In 2007 a DVD release date was announced, only to be pulled at the last minute, with no further info.  Fans have created an online petition to get this movie back on store shelves, and I encourage those interested to sign it.
Ranking among the best biopics ever produced (Ray, Walk the Line, Coal Miner's Daughter), Elvis is the quintessential telling of one of music's most influential performers and a shining note for two of cinema's classic collaborators.
To converts and newbies, I say deluge Dick Clark Productions with mail and calls, and let them know there is a audience for this remarkable, nearly forgotten, film.  Remind them that this year (2009) marks its 30th anniversary -- a perfect way to market this biopic.  Remind them that since Elvis makes more income to this day than he ever did while alive, there IS a vast demographic who would lay down money for it.  Tell them to pay the Bill Monroe estate whatever they want for that music, and get on with releasing this already.  Also tell them that a documentary and a commentary track by John and Kurt would be welcome (they've already expressed interest in doing this).
Click here for ELVIS THE MOVIE - TBS trailer:
Click here and sign the petition to Dick Clark productions.  
Thank you.  Thankyouverymuch.  (News, source;SanjaM, March 2009)

Watch "hounddog" film trailer: As EIN reported on 1 February, the USA DVD release of the controversial Dakota Fanning film, "hounddog", has slipped to around 17 February. The film trailer has been posted on YouTube. (Source: Country Music Examiner, 7 Jan 2009)

Read more about "hounddog" below


For what it's worth: Elvis' talents became buried in embarassing, formula plots: Elvis is Lucky Jackson. And Rusty Wells. And Lonnie Beale. And Tulsa McLean. And Pacer Burton. And Johnny Tyronne.

Those are just some of the interchangeable hunks the King of Rock 'n' Roll was compelled (by Col. Tom Parker) to play during the dark movie days of Elvis Presley's career.

From 1956, the year of his first film role, in “Love Me Tender,” through 1969, when he co-starred with Mary Tyler Moore (who played a nun undercover) in “Change of Habit,” Elvis' musical career took an unfortunate back seat to an ill-conceived attempt to make him a movie idol for teen audiences. Like the clean-cut, singin' heroes he portrayed, the formula plots of these lightweight flicks varied little from picture to picture. Turkeys like “Harum Scarum,” “Double Trouble,” “Tickle Me,” “Girl Happy,” “Roustabout,” “Clambake,” “Speedway” and “The Trouble With Girls.”

Worst of all were all the “songs” Elvis had to croon, tunes unworthy of his towering talent. Anyone for “There's No Room to Rumba in a Sports Car” (from “Fun in Acapulco”)? How about “Do the Clam” (from “Girl Happy”)? Elvis even renders “Old MacDonald (Had a Farm)” in “Double Trouble.”

As Priscilla Presley recounted in a TV Land “Myths & Legends” episode this month (the month of Elvis' birth), her husband was justifiably embarrassed by the schlock he was appearing in. Who could blame him?

There were a couple of exceptions. The early (1957) “Jailhouse Rock” doesn't disgrace Elvis' rebel image, nor does “King Creole” ('58), which was actually directed by Michael Curtiz (“Casablanca”). “Viva Las Vegas” (in '64) at least has Ann-Margret, a terrific title song and, well, Las Vegas.

But today, 32 years after Elvis Presley's death, I cringe for him as he must have cringed himself during the “heyday” of these exploitive cotton-candy flicks. I suppose the memory of them is nobler than that of the overweight, drugged-out Elvis onstage in Vegas near the end of his life, but not much. The King deserved better. Rock 'n' roll deserved better.

Elvis was really before my time. I never got to see him in concert. I first heard his records on oldies stations and I remember, as a kid, liking “Fun in Acapulco.” That's because I didn't know who the real Elvis was. I didn't know what I was missing.

Now we all know what we were missing, and we still do. (Opinion, Source:


Film version of Lamar Fike story: Dallas-based LAMAR FIKE, the key member of Elvis Presley’s famed Memphis Mafia, who formally started up his own Drawbridge Productions in February, is now putting the finishing touches on the accompanying screenplay to his forthcoming book FIKE: AN UNCOMMON JOURNEY ON ELVIS PRESLEY BOULEVARD, written with best-selling celebrity-author Mark Bego, titled “ONE OF THE BOYS; ‘57 TO 60’.”

The screenplay was written by Fike, Bego, and filmmaker D. Edward Stanley. Drawbridge Productions was formalized to bring under one umbrella Fike’s many productions as well as to contain all his ‘intellectual properties’ pertaining to his Presley-related projects in the works.

Says Fike, “There are several ongoing projects and I now to have them all under the Drawbridge umbrella, makes prefect sense.” Fike formed the company with his business partner Taylor G. Atha. Having now finished the screenplay, Fike says that his LA-based agent has already begun shopping it with immediate positive results coming in.

“We want the right type of deal for it … with someone who can effectively get the job done. I look at the finished product, now having been able to take a step or two back, as something that deserves to be on told on film. There’s never been an accurate rending of the Elvis-story, and truth be told, it’s long overdue. So, when we get to the point of putting the film in production, we want it done the right way.” Fike continues, “It’s funny … we wrote the book first, but the screenplay almost wrote itself. We realized during the creation, that again, it is a great story … and, it’s one that’s never been told before and deserves to be.”

Fike is also provisionally on board as a talent judge for a new television show to be produced later this year in the U.S. … enabling him to not only seriously put himself out there again in the public eye, but to appear as a credible force in the business.

“I’ve logged quite a bit of time in this entertainment business, working for talented people like Elvis, Brenda Lee, Johnny Cash, and, record company executive Jimmy Bowen, but I’ve been a bit under the radar. I’m ready to step up to the plate!”  (Source: TheInsider.com)


Investigate 'Hounddog,' Mukasey told.........
Dakota Fanning movie opening over objections from pedophilia opponents:

A federal investigation is being requested by a pro-family organization into the new Dakota Fanning movie "Hounddog," which was made more than a year ago and debuted at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival but kept investors at bay with its graphic sex scenes.

"This is a body of work that sexualizes children. This movie is rated 'R,' begging the question: If a child cannot see the movie, why should a child star in it?" said a letter sent to U.S. Attorney General Michael Mukasey and Deputy Assistant Attorney General Larry Rothenberg.

A copy of the letter also was sent to Empire Film Group, which eventually picked up distribution of the film and whose spokesman Dean Hamilton-Bornstein called it a "coming-of-age drama that deals with serious issues that should resonate with audiences."

"Reportedly, the producer has edited the film from when it aired at the Sundance Festival (a viewing that resulted in people booing and walking out). Yet there is no dispute that these scenes were filmed with minor actors," continued the letter signed by Donna Miller, director of the No More Child Porn campaign, as well as Wendy Wright, president of Concerned Women for America, the nation's largest public policy women's group.

"The producers recently changed their defense from saying that Fanning's nine-year-old character is "celebrating her sexuality" to saying that this film will bring awareness to child rape and received the backing of a 'child support group' with ties to Hollywood and the child actress involved," the letter said. "We request that the Department of Justice investigate those responsible for producing, distributing and making available the movie 'Hounddog.'"

According to a parent-managed IMDB website, there are a number of objectionable scenes involving sex and nudity, including:

  • Lewellen (Dakota Fanning) tries to talk a 10-year-old boy into showing her his penis by promising him a kiss if he does so.
  • Lewellen (Dakota Fanning) sits in a tree nude talking to an adult male.
  • Daddy (David Morse) sneaks into Lewellen's (Dakota Fanning) bedroom as Lewellen lays in bed in her underpants. Later on he climbs in her bed nude.
  • A 12-year-old girl watches her father undress.
  • Daddy (David Morse) pleasures himself as his daughter (Dakota Fanning) watches until he completes the act.
  • There are upshots of little girls' underwear, aged 8 and 12.
  • A 12-year-old girl is raped by a young man in the darkness. Screams and a few images are shown.
  • A 10-year-old boy watches a young milkman rape a 12-year-old friend.
  • A 12-year-old girl is told to remove her clothes by a young man (Christoph Sanders) and she then proceeds to do a seductive Elvis dance for him.
  • A 12-year-old ties two nearly nude children together with snakes and forces them to touch one another at gunpoint.
  • Lewellen (Dakota Fanning) stands in front of the full length mirror, takes her clothes off and looks at herself in the mirror.
  • Lewellen (Dakota Fanning) and Buddy (Cody Hanford) have just finished swimming in the creek when they run to a shed and strip naked. They begin kissing and fondling each other.

There are other objectionable factors include violence, gore, profanity, and alcohol and drugs, the report said.

The letter warned the Department of Justice efforts to crack down on child predators and child sexual exploitation would be "handcuffed" if the sexual exploitation of a child is filmed, shown in movie theaters, given tax breaks and excused as "artistic."

WND has reported just a day ago when the founder of Movieguide, a top film-rating organization in Hollywood, joined up with a call for a boycott of "Hounddog" as well as another new movie, "Towelhead," because of the themes involving sex with children.

"These despicable movies promote pedophilia, whether intentionally or unintentionally," said Ted Baehr, who's well known for his Christian Film & Television Commission work. "There should be a massive public outcry against them. The inclusion of children in sexually explicit films is inappropriate. There also is no excuse for the authorities to allow such material to be shown publicly."

Fanning was 12 when she filmed the movie, portraying a sexually active nine-year-old. In "Towelhead," 18-year-old Summer Bishil played a 13-year-old Arab-American girl who has a "sexual obsession." Miller earlier had raised the issue of taxpayers in North Carolina contributing $387,000 to the production costs of the film.

"Hounddog" director Deborah Kampmeier explained in the film's press kit about Fanning, "She is simply and innocently experiencing and relishing the aliveness of her being, the life force pulsing through her body, celebrating the power and creative force of her sexuality that is her birthright."

"This movie is about a nine-year-old girl, not an adult woman. She should be outside skipping rope or riding her bike, not 'celebrating the power and creative force of her sexuality,'" Miller said.

Baehr was more direct..........."For this gruesome director who has wallowed in perversion to say this is the child exploring her sexuality is insane. It's worse than insane. A child of that age doesn't understand the consequences," he said.

Kampmeier already had a reputation for controversial scenes, depicting a young girl who is raped but doesn't remember the attack and believes she is carrying the Christ child in her earlier work, "Virgin."

After its Sundance screening, Rex Gore, the district attorney in Bolivia, N.C., near where much of the movie was filmed, issued a statement to WND that he found "no violation" of the state's obscenity or sexual exploitation laws. He said the movie was saved by its "artistic value."

"I am aware that there is an outcry from some who find the content of the film disturbing and distasteful. However, public opinion is not the test we must apply as prosecutors; we must apply the law. North Carolina's child exploitation statutes do not apply because none of the acts depicted in the film meet the legal definition of 'sexual activity' under our current law," Gore said at the time.

Baehr didn't hesitate to respond..........."For the state attorney to even suggest that this was art is absolutely insane. He should take a course in art," he said.

Fanning's behavior has been described as more explicit than what was required of Jodie Foster, who as a 12-year-old played a prostitute in "Taxi Driver," a 1976 Martin Scorsese production, or Brooke Shields, who was a New Orleans brothel worker in the "Pretty Baby" movie from 1978.

Blogger Steven Pill said it appears that the public is making its statement already........."I received a somewhat rueful message of congratulations from Eric Parkinson, the CEO of distribution for Empire Film Group," he wrote recently. "According to him, more than 200 theaters across the country had cancelled their scheduled screenings of the motion picture 'Hounddog,' citing pressure from 'vocal groups.'" (Source: Bob Unruh, WorldNetDaily, 6 Jan 2009)


"hounddog" to be released on DVD: Finally, news that this controversial film starring Dakota Fanning will be issued on DVD in the US on 3 February 2009.

DVD Details:

  • UPC: 761450121539
  • Actors: Dakota Fanning, Robin Wright-Penn, Piper Laurie, David Morse
  • Director: Deborah Kampmeier
  • Source: HANNOVER HOUSE
  • Presentation: Wide Screen, Full Screen
  • Language: English
  • Time: 1:42:00

(Celluloid, Source: EIN)

Read EIN's Oct 2007 review of "hounddog" immediately below

(other reviews of "hounddog" also appear further down on this page)


Controversial new Dakota Fanning movie "hounddog": EIN recently watched a "screener" copy of the highly controversial fim, hounddog.  Starring child actor Dakota Fanning and Robin Wright Penn the film tells the story of a troubled young girl, Lewellyn (Fanning) who finds solace through music, particularly Elvis music. The Elvis sub-theme is an important one.
 
The film certainly will not be to everyone's taste.  It features several strong scenes including Lewellyn dancing naked and appearing in only her underwear. However the scene which has caused particular controversy is one where Lewellyn is raped.  Given the sensitive issues around it, the scene is well done with careful scripting and direction. It is not as explicit as some critics suggest.
 
The lead actors all turn in strong performances with Fanning's portrayal of troubled Lewellyn showing maturity beyond her years.  The film also features first rate cinematography. hounddog was produced and directed by Deborah Kampmeier.
 
Due to the controversy around hounddog its general release to cinema (and/or DVD) is still to be announced. 
 

In the US, religious groups protested about the film and politicians (notably North Carolina State Senator, Phil Berger) have also expressed concerns about its content.  The controversy mirrors that once aroused for the Jodie Foster film, Taxi Driver.

Strangely, a similarly powerful and more explicit rape scene of a young black girl in the film adaptation of the John Grisham novel, A Time To Kill, did not meet with any discernable outcry.  This raises a number of questions based around race and increasing conservatism in America today.

Critically acclaimed when shown at this year's Sundance Festival, it is unfortunate that a number of controversial scenes have overshadowed the film as a whole. 

While not the best of its type, hounddog is generally well crafted, but lacks sufficient plot exposition and direction to fully engage the viewer.  Overall, it is a missed opportunity to deal with the issue of serious child abuse. From Full Moon Films, Hand Picked Films, Intandem Films. Running time: 98 minutes. (Film Review, Source: EIN, Oct 2007)

Comment on this review

 

2008

"hounddog" box office update: This week the controversial Dakota Fanning film jumps 12 places to #75 on the US box office with cumulative takings of $122,704. It is in its 11th week of release and is showing in only two theaters. (News, Source: Yahoo, 4 Dec 2008)


"hounddog" box ofice update: In its 9th week of limited release, "hounddog" has now grossed a total of $117,204. It is only screening in 2 US theatres.

Critics are widely split on the film's merits: media critics on Yahoo rate it as a D+ while the public gives it an average B-. (Source: Yahoo, 19 Nov 2008)


"hounddog" - scandalous or relevant?

Dakota Fanning's controversial film, in its own very important way, echoes issues of media and public concern, as did the emergence of Elvis in the mid 1950's! And like Elvis, its reviews are largely critical......with few positive reports.

This begs an important question......how far have we come as a knowledgable and socially aware world since 1956?


Ultimate Elvis 14 DVD boxset: Watching Elvis 14 DVD Ultimate collection Box Set makes one feel that the rumors of the King of Rock and Roll being alive are true and he just made a secret comeback on national television. Yes, that is a great thought to put on the Internet, but before that, make sure you buy the Elvis Ultimate collection Box Set. The Elvis 14 Disc Ultimate collection Box Set contains all the episodes of the television which sometimes works as an insight into the life and times of one of the world’s most famous personalities and at times as a tribute to one of the world’s most troubled individuals.

But all said and done, ensure that you enjoy the life of the King in Kingsize and buy this dvd box set, so that you do not have to scramble around to look for CD box sets while viewing your favorite episode. A DVD can actually store four times as much of data as a CD can.

The cast of Elvis 14 Disc Ultimate collection Box Set with their true to life, takes the television series to a whole new level. Buy the Elvis 14 Disc Ultimate collection Box Set and watch some of the finest talent on television give you a never-before insight into the life and times of the King of entertainers.

Elvis fans will love the Elvis 14 Disc Ultimate collection Box Set, simply because it will traverse them to the golden times of music, free love and especially, Elvis Presley. Elvis 14 Disc Ultimate collection Box Set has won many awards and nominations, which proves that the Elvis 14 Disc Ultimate collection Box Set is one of the best television series in recent times.

Buy the Elvis 14 Disc Ultimate collection Box Set today. Disc 1 - Viva Las Vegas - Elvis
Disc 2 - Spinout , Speedway - Elvis
Disc 3 - The Trouble With Girls - Elvis
Disc 4 - Stay Away, Joe - Elvis
Disc 5 - Girl Happy - Elvis
Disc 6 - Live A Little, Love A Little - Elvis
Disc 7 - Jailhouse Rock - Elvis
Disc 8 - This Is Elvis (1) - Elvis
Disc 9 - This Is Elvis (2) - Elvis
Disc 10 - That’s the Way it is (1) - Elvis
Disc 11 - That’s the Way it is (2) - Elvis
Disc 12 - Charro - Elvis
Disc 13 - Kissin' Cousins - Elvis
Disc 14 - Harum Scarum , Double Trouble - Elvis (Celluloid Elvis, Source: Amber Smith, 4 Nov 2008)


Bubba Nosferatu update: Ron Perlman (opposite) is to play Elvis Presley in a new film. The 'Hellboy' star is set to portray the musical icon in 'Bubba Nosferatu', the follow-up to 'Bubba Ho-Tep', which finds Elvis shooting a film in Louisiana when he runs into trouble with a coven of female vampires.

Paul Giamatti, who is portraying the 'All Shook Up' star's manager Colonel Parker, revealed to website Ain't It Cool News: "He's a great guy. He's an amazingly great guy and I've always loved him as an actor, so when he actually was interested, I couldn't believe our luck man, like "This is f**ing great!" He's a really terrific guy."

Explaining why Bruce Campbell - who portrayed the icon in the first film which saw Elvis take on a re-animated Egyptian mummy - won't be returning to the franchise, Paul added: "Every effort was made by us, he just didn't want to do it and he was cool about it.

"He just didn't want to do it, which is a bummer, because part of the reason I love that movie is him, a big part of it. He's fantastic and I've always loved him. I'm a big fan of his, but he didn't want to do it, which is totally cool." (Celluloid Elvis, Source: MyParkMagazine, 4 Nov 2008)


"hounddog" box office update: After its 6th week in the US Movie Box Office Chart, the controversial Dakota Fanning film has taken a cumulative total of $94,951.00. It is still only showing in 5 theatres and still no word on a DVD release. (Source: Yahoo, 31 Oct 2008)


Ron Perlman replaces Bruce Campbell for Bubba Ho-Tep sequel: With Ron Perlman (Hellboy; TV's Beauty & The Beast - shown opposite) confirmed for Bubba Nosferatu, Journalist Eric Washington says: "I have this fleeting feeling in my soul that tells me the rest of my life is filled with empty promises about supposed sequels to Bruce Campbell cult classics. 

Obviously we’ve all heard the Evil Dead IV rumors that pop up on the internet EVERY OTHER FREAKIN’ DAY (but seriously, Sam Raimi, Rob Tappert and Campbell need to talk to one another and get ONE story for their stock answer when someone asks them about it) – and here’s one I bet you haven’t heard mention of in a while:  Bubba Nosferatu.  What already is known about the project is that old Spruce Bruce will not be returning to reprise his role of Elvis from the 2002 Don Coscarelli cult hit.  So who will be filling Sir Bruce’s shoes? 

According to an interview Ain’t It Cool News had with Paul Giamatti (who is signed on to play Colonel Parker in the flick), none other than Ron “Kid Gorgeous” Perlman!

It’s astounding to think that Perlman will replace Bruce Campbell as Elvis as the latter is a fairly handsome man with a prominent jaw line and the former’s face looks like something that jumps out of the Ark of the Covenant.  But, hey, it’s Hellboy (which I feel will be my defense for anything Perlman does for the rest of his lifetime—“Officer, let him go. I know he robbed my liquor store. But, hey, it’s Hellboy”).  No idea on when Bubba Nosferatu will start shooting but it’s currently got its eyes on a 2009 release.  The follow-up to Bubba Ho-Tep, which Ho-Tep writer-director Don Coscarelli will return to in both roles, is said to follow Elvis while shooting a film in Louisiana when he runs afoul of a coven of she-vampires.  Sounds like fun to me, thank you very much!" (Source: Eric Washington, fearnet.com, 31 Oct 2008)

New David Stanley film 'Restoring My Father’s Honor' in pre-production: Impello Films have announced that it has begun pre-production work on its next feature film “Restoring My Father’s Honor.” From writer, producer, director D. Edward Stanley who captured international interest at his Cannes premier and later through the worldwide release of the Elvis Presley related film 'Protecting The King' in 2007, comes a true story that has been buried for more than fifty years. Restoring My Father’s Honor follows Stanley’s father, Master Sgt. William J. Stanley as he fights his way through D-Day on bloody Omaha Beach only to face an enemy in the form of Vernon Presley, father of Rock icon Elvis Presley.

With his first feature film “Protecting The King” released worldwide in 2007, D. Edward Stanley now brings a true story to the screen that has been buried for more than 50 years. In 1958 Master Sgt. William (Bill) J. Stanley, 3rd Armored Division, was stationed in Frankfurt Germany with his wife and three young sons. That same yearVernon Presley followed his son Elvis Presley, now an Army private also assigned to the 3rd Armored Division, to Frankfurt. In a twist of fate these two men would meet, setting off a series of events that would lead to deceit, dishonor and betrayal. Sgt. Stanley had known only victory in 17 years of military service. From the bloody beaches of Normandy France in 1944 to the carnage of the Korean War, he was a combat soldier with medals that gave silent testimony to his honor and courage. But the day Vernon Presley arrived in Frankfurt, the groundwork was laid for a battle not of guns, tanks and military strategy but of greed, power and money.

Sgt. Stanley would unknowingly be drawn into a battle he didn’t know how to win – a battle that would not only cost him his family, but the honor of the country that he had dedicated his life to defend. “Sgt. Stanley was my father,” said D. Edward Stanley. “I never really got to know my Dad until after his death when I received his memoirs in the mail. I grew up at Graceland as the step-brother of Elvis Presley. The story of what happened to him and how it impacted his life has never been told. And it’s certainly an unknown chapter of the Presley saga.”

“Restoring My Father’s Honor” promises to reach a broad range of audiences with its human drama, military flavor and compelling content. “It’s the story of a combat veteran who fought in some of this nation’s greatest crusades for freedom yet became a casualty of fame,” said Stanley. “But it’s also a story of redemption and restoration.” For more info the film visit www.restoringmyfathershonor.com. Go here for EIN's 2006 interview with David Stanley. (Source: EIN/DS, Oct 2008)


isa Schwarzbaum is a film critic for EW"hounddog" - another view: Film critic Lisa Schwarzbaum was less than impressed by "hounddog":

There's no way Hounddog ain't a greasy gumbo of a mellerdrammer (sorry for the language, that's just the effect of too much Southern Gothic cliché gettin' to me).

But Deborah Kampmeier's pulp fiction — about a country girly devoted to the music of Elvis Presley in a 1950s backwoods located somewhere near Tennessee Williamsland — might have stood a shot at being judged on its own Black Snake Moan terms had it starred some interesting, unknown girl, and not the famous young phenom Dakota Fanning.

Then again, would this arthouse goo have gotten made if Fanning's adult team hadn't agreed it was a fine idea to let their champ wiggle in her underpants?

As it is, Hounddog is destined to be described in shorthand, now and forever, as the one where Dakota Fanning Gets Raped. Even so, that violence is only a small, relatively tastefully handled episode in a drama heaped with clichés like...like a big ol' plate of grits. Here, in one swamp, is a drunk, brain-damaged Daddy (David Morse); a twisted, sin-patrolling Granny (Piper Laurie); a battered, sad, sexy lady (Robin Wright Penn), a Wise Black Man (Afemo Omilami) who teaches our heroine about the real, black man's blues music (none of this Elvis hooey); and lots of snakes. Under the circumstances, Fanning is remarkably collected and even dignified. As for the rest of the gang, they ought to be returned to sender. Rating: F (Source: Lisa Schwarzbaum, EW.com, 26 Sep 2008)


Hounddog director speaks about the film's controversy: AFTER talking with her for five minutes, it's hard to believe director Deborah Kampmeier is the same woman who's been accused of exploiting Dakota Fanning in her Southern-Gothic movie "Hounddog," out Friday.

"I think we live in a society that doesn't nurture and honor women's sexuality for the beautiful and inspiring gift that it is," says Kampmeier, sounding more earth-mothery by the minute. "Instead of nurturing it, we commercialize it and repress it. I wonder why a girl like [Fanning's character] Lewellen, who's in the blossoming of her body, spirit and sexuality, is seen as asking for it?"

It's been a weird couple of years for Kampmeier, whose movie has been, well, dogged with scandal since the day it wrapped in Wilmington, NC, in July 2006. A local conservative radio talk show got its hands on the script that contained a scene in which Fanning's 12-year-old character is assaulted and raped by an older boy.

Cue the knee-jerk outcry.

Various "family values" groups, without having seen the movie, petitioned for legal action against the director and Fanning's family and agent for coercing the young actress into what they imagined to be a disgraceful performance. One child-actor advocate, reported Premiere magazine, wrote an essay in which he argued that "pretending leads to reality. Kids feel it, live it, express it. Children can't shrug it off."

Where was Fanning in all this? Defending the film alongside the director.

"She's been incredibly supportive," Kampmeier says. "Her team was like, 'Nobody touches this script. You do not take this scene out.' "

Furthermore, says the director, anyone who knows anything about filmmaking knows the scene didn't happen the way it plays in the film (which, incidentally, is extremely brief and nongraphic).

"The rape scene was shot so technically," says Kampmeier. "I mean, I think Dakota put it best. She said, 'It's just a movie.' "

Plus, as the director points out, nobody ever levels the same charges at the incredible violence one can find in any number of major movies out right now. "When someone's head gets blown off, why are people not saying, 'Oh my God, did their head really get blown off?' " she says. "It's so uninformed."

The paradox for Kampmeier is that the controversy has brought her film into a much brighter spotlight than she'd imagined - for better or worse. "In my mind it's just a small, personal film," she says. "I wrote it from my heart, with the hope that it would one day touch someone else's heart."

"Hounddog" - the rest of it, aside from that scene - centers on Fanning's character, a young girl trapped in abject poverty with an abusive, alcoholic father (David Morse) and a disciplinarian, Bible-thumping grandmother (Piper Laurie). Her only solace is impersonating Elvis Presley, which she does with uncanny talent.

"For me, the film is about many things," says Kampmeier. "Motherlessness, art, finding your true voice.

"But the thing that I think it's most about," she says, "is articulated by a character in the film - he talks about taking that which can poison you and turning it into something powerful and good. Which is what we, as artists, if we're lucky, get the opportunity to do." (
Source: Sara Stewart, New York Post, 18 Sep 2008)

Watch the "hounddog" film trailer (Source: Canmag)


Elvis saves the day: It always seemed to me that this is the hardest part of the year. Labor Day is past and school is back in session: we are all meant to be serious again after the frivolities of summer. I keep trying to sneak out to see films, but real life keeps thrusting its face forward.

Thus I missed two chances to see "Burn After Reading" already this week and I am now unsure when I'll get to it because the weekend is booked up. Such are the challenges of modern life.

But if frivolity is your bag, check out the Parkway in Minneapolis. Not only is there an Elvis Presley Festival over the next four weekends, showing "Jailhouse Rock," "Viva Las Vegas," "GI Blues," "Love Me Tender," and King Creole," but tonight and on the 27th there is an Elvis Tribute Open Stage where anyone can get up and present their very best Elvis. Details at the Parkway site ( Source: Movie Natters, Euan Kerr, 13 Sep 2008)


Film planned based on the Sonny West memoir: RLF Victor Productions Ltd has announced plans for a movie behind the fame of the legendary Elvis.

Fame & Fortune, an exhilarating and haunting portrait of Elvis, as seen through the eyes of his dear close friend and bodyguard of seventeen years, Sonny West. From his rocket ride to fame as the premier innovator of rock and roll, to the abundance of life in Hollywood as the highest paid actor of his generation, Elvis enjoyed a phenomenal lifestyle that he shared freely with his closest friends and protectors, The Memphis Mafia.

As a personal bodyguard and close friend of Elvis for seventeen years Sonny West lived the roller coaster ride of celebrity excess. But as the pressures of touring and maintaining his public image mounted, Elvis turned to the escapism of overprescribed medicines that ultimately became a life ending dependency.

Sonny West experienced it all and this movie depicts not only the truth behind the fame of the legendary Elvis, but also Sonny’s desperate measures to try to stop the inevitable and save the man he called his best friend, mentor and boss.

Based on the book, Elvis: Still Taking Care of Business, by Sonny West with Marshall Terrill (Source: http://rlfvictorproductions.com/www.epgold.com, 23 Aug 2008)


R.I.P., Elvis, but, man, you made some lousy movies: I was a kid when Elvis Presley tumped over — as they like to say in Jackson County — and died in his bathroom 31 years ago this week. My barber in Marianna broke the news to me on that hot August day as I sat in his shop's chair for a trim. He seemed pretty upset and distracted as he cut my hair with a shaky hand. I walked out of the shop holding Elvis personally responsible for my splotchy new 'do. In 1977, why did anyone still care about a bloated rock star who bellowed "The Impossible Dream" in a Las Vegas casino while dressed like Liberace on laundry day?

As the rapper Chuck D. summed it up: "Elvis was a hero to most, but he never meant (bleep) to me."

Several years after my bad haircut, my anti-Elvis attitude changed completely when I discovered the incredible music that he recorded at Sun Records in the mid-'50s. It's still powerful stuff. I suddenly understood what all the fuss was about. Then I got caught up in the bizarre, kitschy Elvis Death Cult that came along in the '80s.

It's no wonder I ended up in the mob at the gates of Graceland on the 10th anniversary of Presley's passing. And the 20th. And last summer for the 30th.

Because this year is an odd-number anniversary — and a gallon of gas costs more than a necklace made of unicorn horns — I'm not driving to Memphis this week to stand around in the August heat with my fellow weirdos. Instead, I rented a stack of Elvis movies last weekend and paid tribute to the King with a full day of electrifying Elvis cinema.

Was I insane? No one dared me to do it. I was not tied to a chair. Do not, I repeat, do not try this at home.

I started with "Kissin' Cousins," a sunny 1964 incest musical featuring Elvis testing his very limited acting chops by playing a dual role. The dark-haired Elvis stars as an Air Force officer named Josh who's ordered to smooth talk his opossum-eating Tennessee cousins out of their property because the military wants to use it as a base for nuclear missiles. Elvis also plays Josh's mountain-dwelling cousin, Jodie, a blond-haired lug with a waxy complexion who may be a hillbilly golem. When Josh and Jodie tussle (every Elvis movie has to have at least one fight scene with Big El' stompin' some butt), a stand-in is obviously tangling with the Elvis. Let's just say it's not as convincing as Jeremy Irons playing identical twins in "Dead Ringers."

I was expecting another case of the duplicated Elvis with "Double Trouble," a downright strange little musical-adventure made the same year the Beatles were recording "Sgt. Pepper's." Elvis stars as a saloon singer in England who is stalked by a 17-year-old school girl. She follows the lounge lizard to Belgium where they run afoul of bungling diamond smugglers and hired killers. It makes perfect sense for Elvis to interrupt this tale of international intrigue to sing about the joys of killing animals and eating meat in a rockin' version of "Old MacDonald's Farm." He croons the carnivorous ode to his underage crush.

Ewwww. And double Ewwww.

Instead of switching to a watchable Elvis movie such as "King Creole," "Jailhouse Rock" or the overlooked "Live a Little, Love a Little," I decided to dig deeper into the Hollywood pit in which poor Elvis was cast by his miscreant manager Col. Tom Parker.

Did Col. Parker even bother to read the script for "Clambake," the 1967 dung grenade in which Elvis must sing over and over: "Mama's little baby loves clambake, clambake"? Why didn't Elvis storm off the set in '65 when he was forced to sing "Do The Clam" in "Girl Happy"? What was up with all the damn clams in the '60s?

It was only a mere eight minutes into "Tickle Me" (1965) when a bar brawl broke out and Elvis, who's playing a "sagebrush Lothario," started pummeling some patron into submission. That has to be some sort of land-speed record in Elvis world. According to studio records, the horrendous "Harum Scarum" (1965) was shot in 18 days. I say it took it much less time. The poxy plot features Elvis as a pop star who is kidnapped while touring the Middle East and dragged into a plan to assassinate an Arab king. Osama Bin Laden probably uses this film to lure new recruits.

Ah, but my faith was restored in All Things Elvis when I got to his final feature film, "A Change of Habit" (1969). Supposedly, Col. Parker made him turn down the Jon Voight role in "Midnight Cowboy" to star in this sappy, socially conscious drama. Elvis plays a doctor who works with poor kids at a free clinic in the inner city. An undercover nun played by Mary Tyler Moore falls in love with Elvis, who doesn't know she's married to an even bigger star.

During the finale, Moore runs to a church where she has to choose between Elvis — who's singing a gospel song — or Jesus. She looks at Elvis. Then she looks up at the image of Jesus. Then back at Elvis. Then Jesus again. Guess which one she chooses. (Source: Mark Hinson, Tallahassee.com, 10 Aug 2008)


Girl Happy brings back pleasant memories: David Bowling, in a review for Blog Critics Magazine, provides an interesting reflection on one of Elvis' lesser known films, its music and its impact.

Girl Happy remains, for me, the most memorable movie in the Elvis Presley catalogue. Why you ask? Sometime during my 15th year on this earth I screwed up the courage to actually ask a girl out on a date. The gods must have been in a good mood that day as she agreed. What better place to go than to the newest Elvis Presley movie playing at the Park Movie House in Woonsocket, R.I.

The movie was Girl Happy. While the girl, whom I would take to my prom several years later, and the Park are long gone; Girl Happy retains a wonderful place in my memory bank of life.

Girl Happy was an excellent outing for Elvis. The movie actually made sense as Elvis was a singer who was sent to Florida to look after his boss’ daughter who was there for spring break. Shelley Fabares played the daughter and while the chemistry between her and Elvis may not have been of the Ann-Margret caliber, I do consider her to be number two on my list of Elvis’ romantic movie interests. Shelley could act, she could sing and she looked fabulous.

The soundtrack from the movie was issued March 1, 1965 and reached Number 8 on the national charts and earned Elvis another Gold Record. The music is strong and works well within the context of the film and on its own as a stand alone album.

“Girl Happy" is a fine up-tempo pop number that still makes a person smile 40-plus years later. Elvis is in fine vocal form as he belts out what could have been a successful single release. It is vocals that like this one by which Elvis should be remembered.

“Spring Fever,” in the movie, was a duet between Shelley Fabares and Elvis. The album release contained just an Elvis vocal. The duet was superior and did not surface as an official release until it was added as a CD bonus song decades later.

Four more songs conclude the first side of the original LP release. “Startin’ Tonight” “Wolf Call” and even “Fort Lauderdale Chamber Of Commerce” are acceptable pop. Elvis seems to be inspired and really trying as the vocals are crisp and the tracks well produced. “Do Not Disturb” is an excellent ballad in the Presley tradition. All in all this six song set remains one of the best of any contained on his movie soundtracks.

There were two singles released from the album and both probably deserved better than the re-action they received from the record buying public. “Do The Clam” only reached the top twenty for Elvis. The song is not as bad as the title implies. It was a bongo (yes bongo) driven up-tempo song that worked. It even came with a picture sleeve that is quite rare today. “Puppet On A String” may not have been as strong but was certainly better than many of the mid-sixties songs that graced Elvis’ soundtrack albums. Elvis slows the tempo down and just allows his smooth baritone voice to carry the song along.

Girl Happy remains one of the better Elvis Presley movies ranking just below Viva Las Vegas. The soundtrack is also excellent throughout and holds up well. So for an enjoyable evening, grab some popcorn and watch Girl Happy. Better yet, find a date and watch it together. (July 2008)


Mini Elvis Film Reviews: (Source: Amber Smith)

Live A Little, Love A Little: In his 28th film, Elvis Presley plays frazzled photographer Greg Nolan, juggling two jobs and scrambling to keep his work life afloat while also contending with the kooky attentions of a beach beauty (Michele Carey). Four breezy songs, including the recent Elvis chart-buster, “A Little Less Conversation” and the “Edge of Reality” dream sequence add to the zippy fun. And, for the first time, Elvis takes on-screen chances with his public image doing more “adult” comedy.
Kissin' Cousins: In his 15th film, the King takes on two roles in this backwoods romp, playing dark-haired Air Force Lt. Josh Morgan and Morgan’s adversary, blonde good ol’ boy Jodie Tatum. Lt. Josh’s assignment: try to convince his look-alike cousin Jodie to allow a missile site to be built on his land. A fistful of tunes “Barefoot Ballad”, “It’s a Long Lonely Highway,” “Tender Feeling,” the title song and 6 others), some whoop-it-up-dancing and 13 mountain cuties called Kittyhawks add to the down-home delights.
Viva Las Vegas: Elvis Presley is Lucky Jackson, an aspiring auto racer with a dream of winning the Grand Prix. Sexy, spunky Ann-Margret is Rusty Martin, the swimming instructor who falls for him against her will, hating the idea of her man risking his life in a race car. Lucky struggles to raise the money to buy a new engine while Rusty tries to convince him to give up racing for her. George Sidney, a seasoned veteran of the lavish Hollywood musical, proves the perfect helmsman for this high-voltage Elvis vehicle. The King croons, shakes, and shimmies while Ann-Margret shows her mastery of 1960s-style gyrations in the glitzy, electric production numbers. The two charismatic stars are at their best during a hilarious first date, which includes dancing, motorcycling, dressing up at a wild West show, skiing, and going for a ride in a helicopter. How could they not hit it off? Their powerful magnetism centers this glittering, extravagant treasure chest of a film that ranks among Elvis's best.
Speedway: He races. She chases. Yet love and laughter find a way when "World 600" stock car driver Elvis meets Internal Revenue Service collection agent Nancy Sinatra in Speedway. "There Ain't Nothing like a Song," pedal-to-the-metal Elvis and go-go-booted Nancy sing. For the first time since he and Ann-Margret proclaimed Viva Las Vegas, Presley pairs with a high-octane singing, dancing leading lady. Bill Bixby is the manager who mismanages Presley into a $145,000 jam with the IRS and laughs are further fueled by veteran TV funnymen Gale Gordon (The Lucy Show) and Carl Ballantine (McHale's Navy). The supersonic song list includes Let Yourself Go, Your Time Hasn't Come Yet, Baby and Your Groovy Self. Have a groovy time!

Controversial Elvis related film to get limited release in the US: "hounddog", starring Dakota Fanning and Robin Wright Penn is finally getting a "limited" release in America on 18 July 2008 (EIN note: now rescheduled to early Sep 2008).

Film Plot: In late 1950's rural Alabama, young Lewellen lives with her stern religious grandmother, Grammie, but spends most of her time with her much-adored, wild and rough Daddy in his falling down shack. Lewellen is deeply talented and finds comfort and safety, as well as a place to put her hurt and rage, in the music of Elvis Presley, even though Charles, the wise groundskeeper of the mansion down the road, tries to convince her that "there is more to fill out that emptiness with than just Elvis."

Lewellen and her closest friend, Buddy, are caught in a shed during a heavy rainstorm. During the storm Daddy is struck by lightning and the event leaves him incapacitated as an emotional and mental child. Grammie is convinced that Daddy was stricken down by God to punish Lewellen for her alleged sins with Buddy. Lewellen becomes Daddy's caretaker and their dysfunctional relationship becomes even more pronounced, Lewellen becoming the parent and Daddy the child.


Without any guidance, Lewellen begins to move into dangerous terrain. When Elvis Presley comes to town for a concert, Lewellen is desperate to go but has no money for a ticket. So, Buddy tricks Lewellen into dancing and singing like Elvis for Wooden's Boy in exchange for tickets he has to the concert. During the impersonation, Wooden's Boy attacks Lewellen and leaves her innocence behind. Lewellen's descent into the cycle of abuse and her own pursuit of self-destruction begins. It is only Charles who can see the spirit in Lewellen and save her soul. He teaches her to use music, "the Blues," to turn her tragedy into a gift. (Source: Amber Smith, June 2008)

ELVIS FILM FEST TIX ON SALE:

TICKETS FOR ELVIS FILM FEST 5 GO ON SALE FRIDAY, JUNE 6 AT WWW.MALCO.COM AND THE THEATRE BOX OFFICE!

DETAILS:
ELVIS FILM FEST
TUESDAY, AUGUST 12, 2008
STUDIO ON THE SQUARE, MEMPHIS
TICKETS $5 PER FILM

SCHEDULE:
SCREEN #1
KING CREOLE  9:30AM & 11:45AM

SCREEN #2
G.I. BLUES  9:45AM
GIRLS! GIRLS! GIRLS!  12 NOON

SCREEN #3:
BLUE HAWAII  10AM
PARADISE, HAWAIIAN STYLE  11:55AM


THANKS TO OUR FRIENDS AT DEHART GROUP FOR PRESENTING THE 5TH ANNUAL ELVIS FILM FEST!
JOIN US IN AIR-CONDITIONED COMFORT AS WE STROLL DOWN MEMORY LANE VIA THE SILVER SCREEN!
WE LOOK FORWARD TO VISITING WITH OLD FRIENDS AND MEETING NEW!
...8 WEEKS AND COUNTING-SEE YOU SOON!

Karen Scott, Sales & Marketing Coordinator, Malco Theatres, Inc, 5851 Ridgeway Center Parkway, Memphis, Tennessee 38120........901/761.3480........901.681.2044 fax.......karen@malco.com........www.malco.com


Tickets to go on sale for Elvis film festival: Tickets go on sale June 6 at malco.com for "Elvis Film Fest 5," set for Aug. 12 at Malco's Studio on the Square in Memphis.

The annual festival gives fans a chance to experience The King on the big screen in a movie theater, as Elvis-lovers would have done when the films first were released.

This year's schedule of movies includes Elvis as boxer Danny Fisher in "King Creole" (1958), a Harold Robbins adaptation directed by Michael Curtiz ("Casablanca"); Elvis as soldier Tulsa McLean in "G.I. Blues" (1960); Elvis as surfing tour guide Chad Gates in "Blue Hawaii" (1961); Elvis as fisherman Ross Carpenter in "Girls! Girls! Girls!" (1962), which co-stars former Memphian Stella Stevens; and Elvis as helicopter pilot Rick Richards in "Paradise, Hawaiian Style" (1966), which co-stars current Memphian Suzanna Leigh. The movies screen -- sometimes in competition against one another -- from 9:30 a.m. until noon.

Admission is $5 per film, with all ticket proceeds going to support the Todd Morgan Sound Fuzion Performance Enrichment Fund at the University of Memphis. Sound Fuzion is a touring ensemble of vocalists and instrumentalists that performs as part of the concert season of the Rudi E. Scheidt School of Music. (Source: John Beifuss, Commercial Appeal, May 2008)


Elvis Is In The Building...During the ReelHeART International Film Festival (RHIFF): It has just been announced that ’Elvis, How Great Thou Art, A Portrait of the Artist’ is an Official Selection of the ReelHeART International Film Festival (RHIFF) June 16-21, 2008. ’Elvis, How Great Thou Art, A Portrait of the Artist’ has been selected as part of the Dance and Music Related category. ReelHeART is dedicated to supporting the need for exposure for all levels of independent filmmakers around the world.

’Elvis, How Great Thou Art, A Portrait of The Artist’, is part of ’The Memphis Lullaby’ stage play (currently in pre-production) The play and film were written by the author of the book ‘The Memphis Lullaby’ - Linda Ann McConnell. The book has received excellent reviews from all over the world including endorsements from people who knew and worked with Elvis. The film was produced to convey and commemorate the musical significance, cultural impact and artistic achievements of one man and to demonstrate how the power of an individual CAN make a difference.

’Elvis, How Great Thou Art, A Portrait of the Artist’ can be seen on Wednesday June 18 2008 at 9.30PM as part of the ReelHeART Venue Program upstairs at Southern Accent Restaurant , 595 Markham Street (1 Block West of Honest Ed’s). Tickets are $6 (includes Free KERNELS Gourmet popcorn)

If you are part of an Elvis Fan Club, please email us for information about Group Discounts

Advance Sales on line April 21, 2008 at www.reelheart.com

Screeners available for press reviews

Contact filmmaker: Linda Ann McConnell

Email: film@thememphislullaby.com

Website:

www.thememphislullaby.com (6 April 2008)


Frears circles Elvis conspiracy: Most big-name directors develop their own material these days, which makes Stephen Frears a rare beast. He floats, unattached, between movies, teaching at the U.K.'s National Film & TV School, tracking likely scripts and signing up when they are ready to go. But the fact that he won't formally attach himself to development projects doesn't mean he stays out of the process. He and his script editor Jan Fleischer, a fellow NFTS tutor, do a pretty thorough reconstruction job on any screenplay Frears is seriously considering. That's what is happening at the moment with "The Importance of Being Elvis," which looks like being his next movie.

Written by Chris Bradshaw and Roger Payne, pic is the story of Brian from Newcastle, who claims that for many years he was Elvis Presley. This conspiracy comedy is based on the premise that when Elvis was serving in the Army, he was shot in the throat by a crazed fan and could no longer sing. So his manager, Col.Tom Parker, with the collusion of the U.S. government, found an impersonator to replace him. That, the script suggests, explains why the post-army "Elvis" became so uncool.

Project is being developed by two young Brit producers, London-based Manuel Puro and L.A.-based Paul Kewley. Working Title Films is helping out, based on its long-standing relationship with Frears (dating back to "My Beautiful Laundrette"), and has a first look. Frears, a huge Elvis fan, had been looking to do a more traditional biopic of the singer, when he came across this skewed version.

His latest film, the seamy London thriller "Dirty Pretty Things," opens Dec. 13 in the U.K. The Elvis movie would mark a characteristic change of pace and tone for a director who has always varied his game between grit and gloss. (Source: Variety, 1 April 2008)


"Elvis, How Great Thou Art" film chosen for ReelHeART International Film Festival: The How Great Thou Art' Project informs EIN:

We are proud to say…

It has just been announced that 'Elvis, How Great Thou Art, A Portrait of the Artist' has made it through the 3 rounds and has been selected for the ReelHeART International Film Festival 2008 programme under the dance and music related category.

The festival: June 16-21, 2008, Toronto, Canada.

ReelHeART International Film Festival  founders and directors share the belief that "Art Can Change The World".

'Elvis, How Great Thou Art, A Portrait of The Artist', was written and produced by Linda Ann McConnell to convey and commemorate the musical significance, cultural impact and artistic achievements of one man and to demonstrate how the power of an individual CAN make a difference. The film is part of  'The Memphis Lullaby' stage play.

More details to be released late March 2008. 

You can visit the Memphis Lullaby site to see 3 min of the film: www.thememphislullaby.com

and myspace: www.myspace.com/whitehavenofficialspace  

Read more about Elvis, How Great Thou Art


New film - Graceland To Memphis The King Returns: Yet another film around Elvis has been announced.

Genre: Fantasy/Dramedy
Running time: 90 min.
Shooting format: 35mm

Starring: George Thomas
Directed by: M.Z. Silverz
Technical Advisor: Sonny West
Director of Photography: Grisha Alasadi
Advising Producer: Al Rubin
Supervising Producer: Jacov Bressler
Film Consultant: Alex Butterfield
Still Photography by Linda Lynn Carfagno


Synopsis:
It's been almost 30 years since the King died. But was he really dead? In 1977, he was whisked away to another galaxy, but now, the King returns. As he doesn't want anyone to know who he really is, he enters an Elvis impersonator contest in Las Vegas. And the trouble begins...

Production status: Post Production, release slated for 2008.
(Source: EP Gold, 9 March 2008)

Visit the film website and watch the trailer


 

New website for the David Stanley film, Protecting The King:

Click here to visit the site

Read EIN's review of "Protecting The King"


Elvis music set to back President Clinton & Monika Lewinsky movie: While investors debate over Oliver Stone's film "Bush" a script about President Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky has quietly circulated around Hollywood. Set to Elvis Presley music, "Bill and the Silk Box" is a comedy/drama about the popular President, whose Secret Service nickname was "Elvis."

"Nothing will be more entertaining than for the Clintons and the Bushes to compete at the box office," said Daniel R. Vovak, a screenwriter and owner of Greenwich Creations. "The challenge of writing the script was juggling the political motivations of the characters with the importance of giving the film broad appeal. The Clinton era needs to be put into proper perspective, with comedy as its medium." Vovak said he's open regarding casting, contrasting with Stone's narrow approach of portraying Bush as Josh Brolin. He sees Bill Paxton, David Morse, or Tim Robbins in the role as Bill Clinton. Monica Lewinsky could be played by Amanda Bynes, Nia Vadralos, or Minnie Driver. (Hillary Clinton, the former First Lady, does not have any speaking parts.)

Vovak worked ardently to write the movie based on a true story, doing intense research and interviewing some colorful characters. Through his career, Vovak has met James Carville, George Stephanopoulos, and various reporters and White House photographers. He also had the chance to speak with Paula Jones, with whom the President settled a lawsuit for $850,000.

"Talking with the real-life characters gave me a well-rounded perspective of the former President," said Vovak. "I deduced that Bill is a lonely person in private, which is a consistent theme in Elvis' music, and a perfect hook for the script." The plot of the film is from July 1995 through January 1998, while the White House was in turmoil over Paula Jones and a brief government shutdown. Meanwhile, Monica Lewinsky was secretly enticed by gifts from Bill. The script also depicts a scheming White House staff that sends Monica to permanent exile in the Pentagon until she licks her wounds and returns for a place in United States history.

According to Vovak, he has Japanese representation because of the complexity of Elvis music ownership and their overlapping business interests with Elvis Presley Enterprises. Vovak has also written the movies: Redeeming Stella, Unsilent Partner, and Whereabouts Unknown. Media contact: Daniel R. Vovak, Ghostwriter Greenwich Creations DanialVovak@gmail.com, 202-367-4835 http://www.greenwichcreations.com/movies (News, Source: PR Newswire, 5 Feb 2008)


"Elvis" character to feature in new James Bond film: For those of you who have completely given up on trying to remain spoiler-free, there are now many details of a key car chase that will occur in the film along with the mention of a new "Elvis" character. The Italian press have been detailing that the usual high-speed car-chase will take place along the banks of Lake Garda, between the resort towns of Navene and Malcesine and that the cars are expected to top speeds of 125 mph. According to them "the pursuit will feature spectacular and reckless maneuvers in a series of tunnels, culminating with a scene where a truck brings the action to an abrupt halt and a huge explosion." Finally, of interest to Elvis fans, is that thanks to some advance toy marketing we know that there will be a character in this film known as 'Elvis.' There's no confirmation on who this character is supposed to be, but since he is prominent enough to be toy-worthy, expect yet another casting announcement soon. The film is the 22nd James Bond movie.

(News, Source:EIN/M16)


Obsessive Elvis Fan and Thief inspires UK TV Drama: A new UK TV drama is to tell the story of a real life Elvis fanatic. 'Caught In A Trap' due to be aired at the end of the year, was actually inspired by former North Kesteven District Council employee Julie Wall. She stole more than £500,000 to fund her obsession with The King buying 8,000 Elvis records, CDs, DVDs and signed mementoes - often for a lot more than their market value. Reality TV star Connie Fisher has been cast to play Wall.
Business manager Garry Goodge said: "I have never thought of the story as a script or film material but I suppose it is very quirky and a strange thing to happen. "It will highlight the fact that no-one uncovered it for such a long time and because of the Elvis thing there is a strong fan base out there - it will capture the imagination." An employee for 30 years, Wall stole the money from Sleaford parking meters. And her deviant sprees went unnoticed for nine years while she ferreted away an average of £4,850 a month. The title 'Caught In A Trap' aptly reflects Wall's eventual fate - a three-year prison sentence. But possibly more distressing was the sale of the precious loot to repay the council's loss. (Source: EIN, Feb 2008)

Stephen Frears' movie 'The Importance of Being Elvis' put On Hold: Back in 2004 Oscar-Wining director Stephen Frears ('The Queen', 'Hi-Fidelity', 'Mrs Henderson Presents') talked of making a new comedy-drama 'The Importance of Being Elvis'. The reported premise of 'The Importance of Being Elvis' was about a man who assumes Elvis' identity while the singer was serving in the U.S. Army during the late 1950s. Elvis loses his golden singing voice after being shot in the throat. An impersonator named Brian is then tapped by Elvis' shady manager, Col. Tom Parker, and the U.S. government to take over for The King. Stephen Frears was to direct with the screenplay by Christopher Bradshaw & Roger Payne. Stephen Frears' representative told EIN this week that Frears is no longer involved with his Elvis project but will let EIN know if anything changes. (Celluloid News, Source;EIN)

New film being screened at Elvis Birthday Bash 2008: Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Jan. 19, Capitol Theater, 206 Fifth Ave. E., Olympia. Featuring a live performance by Elvis impersonator Robert Washington, world-premiere screening of "How He Should Have Died," an Elvis costume contest and fried peanut butter and banana sandwiches. $10 from Rainy Day Records, Traditions Cafe, Boomerang Entertainment or at the box office the night of the show. $25 VIP tickets and more details are available at www.elvisbirthdaybash.com. (Celluloid Elvis/Almost Elvis, The Olympian Online)

 

2007

"Walk Hard" film flops at box-office: The latest film from the Judd Apatow comedy machine, Sony's "Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story," was a surprise bomb on devut at US and Canadian theaters, taking in just $4.1 million despite good reviews praising its no-holds-barred humor and John C. Reilly's giddy performance. The film includes good natured parodies of Elvis, Johnny Cash and Bob Dylan, among others. Read more about Walk Hard further below. (Source: Yahoo Movies, 24 Dec 2007)


"Tears Of A King" Official Website

From the press release: What do you think of when someone mentions Elvis Presley? The music, the outfits, and his gyrations during his early career, of course. What you probably don't think of is his spiritual side, witnessed by notes he left in a Book of Mormon. A new movie, currently in production, shows that side of the "King".

On an
Orem soundstage, production is underway on a new movie about Elvis Presley, but it will not focus on his music. Fans certainly remember the King in his early years -- young, vibrant. Prior to his death, Presley struggled with alcohol and drugs, which is well documented. What isn't, was his spiritual journey in those last years.

Rob Diamond, Director/Screenwriter: "Elvis was very interested in spirituality. To me he was a seeker of truth and knowledge, and any information that could make him a better man."

Rob Diamond has written and is directing "Tears of a King" which explores that part of Elvis' life. The movie looks at the period when Presley studied the teachings of the
LDS
Church. He was given a Book of Mormon and visited with missionaries a number of times.

The producers wanted to make this film, after examining Presley's Book of Mormon, which is now in the church's historical department. The Osmond family, which knew Presley, was given the book after his death, and donated it to the church.

On various pages throughout the book, are handwritten notes, believed to be written by Presley. He'd underlined the word "KING" throughout the book; and on one page, there is this: "My daughter Lisa needs this church. She's nine. Please help her..."

Rob Diamond: "My feeling of looking at the passages that he marked, were of a man that was hurting and sincerely wanted help from his maker."

The numerous handwritten notes-- though not authenticated as being Presley's-- were the inspiration for the film.

Rob Diamond: "And so, hopefully, when people walk away from the film they won't care whether he studied Mormonism, Judiasm or whatever, that they are drawn to a man who was seeking truth and peace in his life."

No one will ever know, however, whether Elvis indeed found it.

The movie "Tears of a King" will be released next year, to coincide with the 30th anniversary of Presley's death.


New film set to debut:

Tears Of A King has its world debut on Thursday 20 December at the Scera Theater in Orem, Utah.

It screens from 6pm to 9pm. The Scera Theater is located at 745 South State Street.

Tickets are $10.00 each.

A special musical presentation by Matt Lewis will follow the movie - highlights from the movie soundtrack.

Call (801) 319-2997 for more details.

For more about Tears Of A King visit EIN's Celluloid Elvis page

 

 


"Walk Hard" film review: Whereas the House of Blues icons the Blues Brothers specialize in covers, many of the songs featured in "Walk Hard," the latest film from the Judd Apatow ("Superbad," "Knocked Up") comedy empire, are originals. Each tune is a good-natured parody of artists such as Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash and Bob Dylan, among others. Read full review (News, Source: Presleys In The Press, 6 Dec 2007)


“Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story,” opening Dec. 14 in the US. - “Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story,” the upcoming biopic-spoof starring John C. Reilly, is either going to be very, very good or very, very bad. But I’m betting that, even if it’s very, very bad, it’ll still be better than any other biopic-spoof you’re going to see this year. (Granted, there probably won’t be any other biopic spoofs released this year, but that’s not the point here, OK?)

Directed by Jake Kasden (who co-wrote the script with Judd Apatow), the tale of Dewey Cox — who’s equal parts Johnny Cash, Elvis Presley and Buddy Holly — has it all: tough upbringing, musical dreaming. Booze, drugs and cute back-up singers (Jenna Fischer). Think “Walk the Line,” “Ray” and maybe even a touch of “Coal Miner’s Daughter,” but don’t think too hard … that’s not the point here.

The real appeal of “Walk Hard,” however, may be its wealth of cameos. Everyone from the White Stripes’ Jack White (as Elvis Presley) and Jason Schwartzman (as Ringo Starr) to Patrick Duffy (!) and Eddie Vedder (both as themselves) — make the musical mystery tour through Dewey Cox’s fabled life.

Rating: 3 dancing popcorn guys (out of 4) (Source: Rachel Leibrock, The Sacramento Bee/KansasCity.com, 23 Nov 2007)


Controversial new Dakota Fanning movie "hounddog": EIN recently watched a "screener" copy of the highly controversial fim, hounddog.  Starring child actor Dakota Fanning and Robin Wright Penn the film tells the story of a troubled young girl, Lewellyn (Fanning) who finds solace through music, particularly Elvis music. The Elvis sub-theme is an important one.
 
The film certainly will not be to everyone's taste.  It features several strong scenes including Lewellyn dancing naked and appearing in only her underwear. However the scene which has caused particular controversy is one where Lewellyn is raped.  Given the sensitive issues around it, the scene is well done with careful scripting and direction. It is not as explicit as some critics suggest.
 
The lead actors all turn in strong performances with Fanning's portrayal of troubled Lewellyn showing maturity beyond her years.  The film also features first rate cinematography. hounddog was produced and directed by Deborah Kampmeier.
 
Due to the controversy around hounddog its general release to cinema (and/or DVD) is still to be announced. 
 

In the US, religious groups protested about the film and politicians (notably North Carolina State Senator, Phil Berger) have also expressed concerns about its content.  The controversy mirrors that once aroused for the Jodie Foster film, Taxi Driver.

Strangely, a similarly powerful and more explicit rape scene of a young black girl in the film adaptation of the John Grisham novel, A Time To Kill, did not meet with any discernable outcry.  This raises a number of questions based around race and increasing conservatism in America today.

Critically acclaimed when shown at this year's Sundance Festival, it is unfortunate that a number of controversial scenes have overshadowed the film as a whole. 

While not the best of its type, hounddog is generally well crafted, but lacks sufficient plot exposition and direction to fully engage the viewer.  Overall, it is a missed opportunity to deal with the issue of serious child abuse. From Full Moon Films, Hand Picked Films, Intandem Films. Running time: 98 minutes. (Film Review, Source: EIN)

Comment on this review


Release of "Elvis The Movie" (Kurt Russell) update: After our news item yesterday, Elvis Australia contacted First Look Media. First Look said that release of the Kurt Russell "Elvis" biopic on DVD is "to be advised". (Oct 18)


What's happening with the "Elvis The Movie" (Kurt Russell) DVD release?: Amazon has advised EIN that it cannot supply the continually delayed DVD edition of the famous Kurt Russell Elvis biopic. Meanwhile on its site, the distributor of the DVD, First Look Media, shows the DVD as being available now but does not include a 'Buy' link as it does with its other releases. As First Look does not show an email address, perhaps a fan in the US might like to ring the company (Phone: (424) 202-5000) to find out what's happening. (News, Source: Amazon/First Look Media)


Harold Robbins not impressed with film version of his book "A Stone For Danny Fisher" (aka "King Creole"): Daryl posted this very informative and interesting message on the FECC board:

Anew biography of Harold Robbins by Andrew Wilson titled "Harold Robbins - The Man Who Invented Sex" just came out recently. As many of you know, Harold Robbins wrote the novel, "A Stone For Danny Fisher" which "King Creole" is based upon. Here is a review of the book "Harold Robbins - The Man Who Invented Sex."

http://www.usatoday.com/life/books/reviews/2007-10-08-harold-robbins_N.htm?csp=34&loc=interstitialskip

Here is an extract from the book (pages 87-89):

The process by which Robbins's A Stone For Danny Fisher, a raw novel about a Jewish boy growing up in Brooklyn and becoming a boxer, transformed itself into King Creole, a musical starring Elvis Presley as a hip gyrating New Orleans nightclub singer who gets involved in organized crime, is symptomatic of Hollywood's tendency toward bastardization. Although the movie may well be one of Elvis's best films, it bears such a slim resemblance to the original book that Paramount could have easily have saved itself the $25,000 it paid Robbins for using his novel as source material.

It had all started so promisingly. Hal Wallis envisaged Marlon Brando, fresh from his success in The Wild One, On The Waterfront, and Guys And Dolls, for the central role of Danny and enlisted the services of Michael Curtiz, the director famous for Casablanca, Mildred Pierce and White Christmas. Wallis passed Robbins's treatment on to scriptwriter and actor Michael Vincente Gazzo, who earned $10,000 for the job. But Curtiz found the script, which Gazzo delivered in May 1955, disappointing. In Curtiz's opinion it was important to remain faithful to the original novel, and he suggested opening the film with the first scene of the book, in which a little boy places a stone on his father's grave. The problem, as he saw it, was that "Danny has been turned into a conventional, unreal, dead-end kid hero," he wrote to Hal Wallis, "underpriviledged by his father and society...Thus we have an old-fashioned, unrealistic, abused hero, who does not create his own destiny."

Central to both the book and the film, said Wallis, was Danny's relationship with his father, "a small professional man who has done everything possible for his son and has big plans for him, but who is trapped in an economic upheaval; and a son so eager for a place in the world and so bewildered and desperate at ill fortune that he blames his father in haste. These are two human beings we can understand and feel for, and the situation is real because one of them created it, and the other responds in a real, human way."

Wallis met with his co-producer Joseph Hazen and associate producer Paul Nathan to discuss the weaknesses of the script. Hazen thought it helpful to compare the psychological dynamic at the heart of A Stone For Danny Fisher to the dysfunctional father-son relationship in Tennessee Williams's Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. "It is this impenetrable wall -- this lack of communication and understanding between father and son -- which is a major contributing factor to the tragedy of Danny Fisher," Hazen wrote in a memo to Nathan. "Had Danny been able to understand his father's point of view more completely and had Danny's father been more aware of and more sympathetic and understanding of Danny's problem, Danny would not have developed into a misanthrope."

When Marlon Brando turned down the role, Wallis and his team were desparate to find another big star with the same kind of rebellious associations and capacity for brooding intensity. Naturally, at the top of their list was Elvis Presley, who had already made three films, Love Me Tender, Loving You, and Jailhouse Rock. Wallis knew the star -- who was paid nearly $72,000 for eight and and a half weeks' work -- was guaranteed box office, but one of the consequences of hiring him was that the script would now have to incorporate some songs. After all, what was the point of casting the essence of rock 'n' roll and not taking advantage of his performing skills? A number of songs were quickly written, including one called "Sing, You Sinners," and by October 1956 Paul Nathan had persuaded the rest of the production team that they should construct the narrative of the film around the song. The source material was all but abandoned, and the project became a showcase of Elvis's talents.

The producers of the film -- which now went under the title Sing, You Sinners -- moved the action from New York to New Orleans, and Danny Fisher became the rebellious son of a minister. "We changed the leading character from a prizefighter to a singer," said Wallis. Wallis then employed composer and writer Herbert Baker at the rate of $1,250 a week to polish the script. Finally, by the end of 1957 the team had something they felt they could shoot, and the screenplay was sent off to the office of the Production Code to ensure that it did not breach decency regulations.

Geoffrey Shurlock, the vice president and director of the official body, wrote to Hal Wallis with three pages of potential problems. Many of his comments were minor ones, for instance, requesting that expressions such as "Jeez" be removed from the script. Others -- such an intimate scene in which Ronnie (Carolyn Jones) offers herself to Danny (Elvis Presley) -- necessitated a more drastic rewriting of the script.

"This sequence is unacceptable under the Code," wrote Shurlock "...Such lines as, 'Do you think you could take a day out of your life and give it to me?' and 'Then love me -- for today,' together with the action of both of them lying together on the sand, must be revised in such a way as to keep their relationship a moral and clean one."

The shooting of the film started in New Orleans on 20 January 1958. Presley's presence in the city resulted in hysteria. "When we were on location in New Orleans, the crowds were so huge that we had to arrange for top security," said Wallis. "When we shot on the streets, police and ropes were necessary to hold back the crowds."

When the film opened that July, it was met with enthusiastic reviews and became a box-office hit. But for Robbins the movie was nothing less than a travesty. Later in life he pretended to be nonchalant about it -- "I got the check," he said, referring to the film -- but privately he always felt frustrated that his Danny Fisher, a story so close to his heart, had never made it onto the silver screen.
(Source: FECC, Oct 2007)


EPE announces 24 Elvis DVD releases

including SEVEN never before released (on DVD) Elvis films!!! (11 May 2007)


New edition - Bubba Ho-Tep (Hail To The King Edition): Wickedly offbeat horror/comedy from "Phantasm" helmer Don Coscarelli presents a wildly imaginative "what if?" tale of an aged and bitter Elvis Presley (Bruce Campbell) who now lives in a run-down Texas nursing home. After befriending fellow resident Jack (Ossie Davis), who claims to be John F. Kennedy, the two geezers team up to battle an ancient Egyptian mummy that's sucking the souls out of the other senior citizens. With Ella Joyce, Bob Ivy, Daniel Roebuck, and Reggie Bannister. 92 min. Widescreen; Soundtrack: English Dolby Digital 5.1; Subtitles: English, French, Spanish; audio commentary by Campbell, Coscarelli; "making of" documentary; featurettes; deleted scenes; photo gallery; TV spot; theatrical trailer. (News, Source: Chris M, FECC board)


 

Warner DVD releases: Here are the details on the 2007 DVD releases from Warner Bros. The company will release 10 DVDs:

One disc editions: "Charro!", "Kissin' Cousins", "Girl Happy", "Live a Little, Love a Little" and "Stay Away, Joe".

Two disc editions: "Elvis: That's the Way It Is" and "This is Elvis".

Deluxe editions: "Jailhouse Rock" and "Viva Las Vegas".

The editions of "Jailhouse Rock" and "Viva Las Vegas" include a documentary, "TTWII" includes both the original and SE editions while "This Is Elvis" includes the theatrical version and much longer TV version plus other material. The single disc releases probably don't include any extras.

Also mentioned is "Tickle Me", but no details were given.
(Source: Elvis Movie Guide /Elvis News, 8 May 2007)


Warner Bros DVD News: Mike Windgren posted this message on the FECC board:

Hi there!! . It has been just announced on a very reliable Spanish DVD website called ZONADVD.COM , you can check it if you want. On August 6, 2007 Warner will release on the 30th Anniversary, Special editions on DVD of the next movies : Viva Las Vegas, Jailhouse Rock, documentary That´s The Way It Is and Biopic movie This Is Elvis plus more Elvis dvd releases. I understand we will not have Elvis On Tour DVD . Soon this website will have more information on these releases. I thought this news would make us all happy . Bye for now . Mike Windgren. (News, Source: FECC, 3 May 2007)


Elvis films to screen in Melbourne, Australia: Thanks to Tony Cannata who informs us Melbourne fans are in for a treat with the Astot Theatre to screen 3 Elvis films this month. The Astor Theater is located at the corner of Chapel St & Dandenong Rd St Kilda Ph No 9510 1414  www.astor-theatre.com

May 12: 3:30pm Viva Las Vegas.

May 20: Double feature from 7:30pm  Clambake & Thats The Way It Is. (News, Source: Tony Cannata, 2 May 2007)


Sci-Fi Elvis film: Elvis Express Radio has published the following report about a planned sci-fi film around Elvis:

Elvis does not die in 1977? He is whisked away on a flying saucer to another galaxy where he does not age.  

Then he returns 30 years later. He wants to stay anonymous, so what does he do....? Why, he joins an Impersonator contest in Las Vegas of course! Then the mob goes after him, and the fun begins?"

The official website states that Sonny West is involved in the movie, however we think (or hope) that this is just some joke?
Anyway, here is what we found on the site.


Graceland to Memphis - The KING Returns
Genre: Musical / Fantasy
Running time: 90 min.

Starring: TBA.....Directed by: TBA

Synopsis: It's been almost 30 years since the King died. But was he really dead?
In 1977, he was whisked away to another galaxy, but now, the King returns. As he
doesn't want anyone to know who he really is, he enters an impersonator contest.
And the trouble begins...

Production status: In Development.

Additional information: Attached to the project at the moment:
Sonny West - the King's former bodyguard (technical advisor)
Sean Lawlor - actor (Braveheart)
Tony Tarantino - actor, filmmaker (Source: Elvis Express Radio/ Westham Films
)

"Lonely Street" movie appears to be getting very lonely: A comedy-thriller film adaptation of the Bubba Mabry P.I. mystery, Lonely Street, by Steve Brewer, appears to be in limbo. Directed by Peter Ettinger and starring Jay Mohr and Robert Patrick, the Elvis flavored film apparently finished post-production in 2006 but online listings show no scheduled release date.

The film description is: A private detective in New Mexico is hired by a man to bodyguard a visiting celebrity from an overzealous fan. The celebrity turns out to be Elvis--determined to keep a low profile--and the fan turns out to be a sleazy tabloid reporter--determined to break the story that the King is still alive. The P.I.'s predicament grows darker when the reporter winds up dead in a motel room, and he becomes the number one suspect after Elvis and the man who hired him skip town. (Source: Amber Smith, 5 Jan 2007)


Dakota Fanning "rape" film to screen at Sundance: Maybe the most controversial film heading to this month's Sundance Film Festival concerns the rape of a 12-year-old girl while Elvis Presley is heard singing in the background. "HoundDog," written and directed by Deborah Kampmeier, is already getting more advance attention than "Chapter 27," the film about Mark David Chapman murdering John Lennon.

That's because the character played by 12-year-old actress Dakota Fanning, who made her mark six years ago in "I Am Sam," is raped onscreen. Kampmeier doesn't show the actual rape, but it's quite clear, from sources who've seen the film, that as scripted and directed, the scenes in question are going to cause as big if not bigger uproar than when Brooke Shields played a pre-pubescent prostitute in Louis Malle's classic "Atlantic City." (EIN note: should read "Pretty Baby")

In a terrific piece in the new Premiere magazine, Fanning's agent, Cindy Osbrink, tells writer Henry Cabot Beck: "I've been working with Dakota since she was five, and this is something we haven't seen her do. Something that really challenged her talent. 'HoundDog' was one of the best experiences of her life, a story that needs to be told, and she tells it with her soul as no one else can."

Apparently there are already a number of Web sites protesting this film, and lots of comments on the Internet Movie Data Base lamenting the potential exploitation of Fanning. What could do the movie in, though, is the soundtrack of Elvis Presley records. It's unclear whether the Presley estate will approve the licensing of the ultimate pop idol's voice as the film's backdrop, or even if the writers of the song "Hound Dog" — Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller —won't do something to keep their famous composition out of it.

No producers are credited yet for "HoundDog," by the way, but the Premiere article does cite Jean Gatien as having raised funds and lists her as "daughter of New York club owner Peter Gatien." For the record, Peter Gatien — implicated in the famous nightclub murder of Angel Melendez that was depicted in the Macaulay Culkin movie "Party Monster"— was deported to Canada in 2003. He'd pled guilty in 1999 to not paying $1.9 million in taxes and spent 60 days in jail, after he was acquitted of federal drug charges in 1996.

His many New York clubs, like Limelight and the Tunnel, were the scenes of constant drug raids during their heyday. (Source: FOX News, 3 Jan 2007)

 

2006

A Day In The West Presents Elvis Presley Movie Memories: Sedona, Arizona: When Bob Bradshaw came to Sedona back in 1945 there wasn't much here. Over the next 50 years,  many films were made in Sedona and Bob was a part of most of them, serving as location scout, stuntman, and even actor. He built the first western town for use in the booming movie industry (located beneath Coffee Pot Rock), and was one of the first Marlboro Men - many say he is still alive because he never actually smoked. Bob Bradshaw is also one of the renowned early photographers of Sedona.

The Adventure Company and A Day In The West are presenting brief vignettes of selected Bob Bradshaw's photographs and movie memories.

In 1967, the movie was Stay Away Joe, starring Elvis Presley, Katy Jurado, Burgess Meredith, Joan Blondell, L.Q. Jones, Warren Vanders, Buck Kartalian, Susan Trustman, Quentin Dean, Henry Jones, Anne Seymour, Thomas Gomez, Doug Henderson, Angus Duncan and Michael Love. The Hollywood studio was MGM.


"I found a house for him (Elvis) to stay in below King's Ransom on Oak Creek. I found another place for his Memphis Mafia entourage nearby. Security was a big thing, and most of us weren't used to that kind of protection. The movie took 2.5 months to film, and a lot of it was shot on the Bradshaw Ranch. Elvis was a nice guy, very down to earth, and seemed to enjoy the process of filming in Sedona."  - Bob Bradshaw

Bradshaw was the first to offer tours of the Sedona Red Rocks on horseback, and created what is now known as the "Broken Arrow" trail. Although commercial jeeps started driving tours on the Broken Arrow trail in 1958, the trail remained virtually unchanged until 1985. A Sedona icon and popular photographer, you'll see Bob Bradshaw's work all over Sedona and Arizona. For many years he contributed images to Arizona Highways. He still lives in Sedona. (Source: Rob DeMayo, A Day In The West, 19 Dec 2006)

Elvis: The Ultimate Film Collection – Graceland Edition: has just been released! It is NOT available in stores and is available first to you -- Elvis’s most loyal fans.

This incredible collection contains 9 DVD movies, 2 special DVD’s (including Elvis: Black Leather Concert and never before seen home movies), a music rarities CD, movie posters and photos, collectible booklets, copy of the Jailhouse Rock Script and confidential movie files. All presented in a beautiful collectors’ case.

BUY NOW at www.elvis.com/movies and you will also receive a one of a kind DVD collection mousepad. (Limited quantities of the mousepad available!). EPE is offering payment in 4 monthly instalments.

Relive Elvis’s greatest movie moments and memories in this one of a kind box set. Elvis’ movies and music are timeless and this box set is a perfect way to share it with friends and family, now and forever.

Don’t Miss Your Opportunity To Take Home A Piece Of Elvis History!!! (News, Source: EPE, 22 Sep 2006)


"Tears of A King" film update: Further to our report below here is the press release about the film exploring links between Elvis and the Book of Mormon:

From the press release: What do you think of when someone mentions Elvis Presley? The music, the outfits, and his gyrations during his early career, of course. What you probably don't think of is his spiritual side, witnessed by notes he left in a Book of Mormon. A new movie, currently in production, shows that side of the "King".

On an Orem soundstage, production is underway on a new movie about Elvis Presley, but it will not focus on his music. Fans certainly remember the King in his early years -- young, vibrant. Prior to his death, Presley struggled with alcohol and drugs, which is well documented. What isn't, was his spiritual journey in those last years.

Rob Diamond, Director/Screenwriter: "Elvis was very interested in spirituality. To me he was a seeker of truth and knowledge, and any information that could make him a better man." Rob Diamond has written and is directing "Tears of a King" which explores that part of Elvis' life. The movie looks at the period when Presley studied the teachings of the LDS Church. He was given a Book of Mormon and visited with missionaries a number of times.

The producers wanted to make this film, after examining Presley's Book of Mormon, which is now in the church's historical department. The Osmond family, which knew Presley, was given the book after his death, and donated it to the church. On various pages throughout the book, are handwritten notes, believed to be written by Presley. He'd underlined the word "KING" throughout the book; and on one page, there is this: "My daughter Lisa needs this church. She's nine. Please help her..."

Rob Diamond: "My feeling of looking at the passages that he marked, were of a man that was hurting and sincerely wanted help from his maker."

The numerous handwritten notes-- though not authenticated as being Presley's-- were the inspiration for the film. Rob Diamond: "And so, hopefully, when people walk away from the film they won't care whether he studied Mormonism, Judiasm or whatever, that they are drawn to a man who was seeking truth and peace in his life."

No one will ever know, however, whether Elvis indeed found it. The movie "Tears of a King" will be released next year, to coincide with the 30th anniversary of Presley's death. Set for release on September 12, 2006 is another budget release entitled "Good Rockin' Tonight". This release comes from the German Membran/ Intense label. Watch video promo (Source: Amber Smith, 17 Sep 2006)


New film looks at Elvis and the Book of Mormon: We know him as the king of rock and roll and much was written about his spiritual side. But not many people know Elvis was looking into The Book of Mormon. That is now the subject matter of a new movie being filmed in Utah County.

Writers of the upcoming film suggest that while in Hawaii Elvis received a copy of the Book of Mormon from a stranger on a movie set. Elvis Presley never joined the LDS church but filmakers say it was apparent he was quite curious about it.

The movie takes a look into Elvis' spiritual quest and suggests that the Book of Mormon was a source of comfort for him, especially during periods of hardship. The movie shows actual excerpts Elvis read and wrote personal notes on the side of the scriptures. The actual copy of the Book of Mormon that Elvis read and wrote in is now in the LDS archives. The film is expected to be released next year, which would be thirty years after Elvis' death. Watch video promo (Source: Sanja Meegin, 15 Sep 2006)


"Elvis: How Great Thou Art" documentary film receives standing ovation in Glasgow: Elvis, How Great Thou Art, adapted from the book, The Memphis Lullaby, is a documentary portrait commemorating the artist Elvis Aaron Presley’s Musical, Cultural and Historical legacy. For the first time, his artistic legacy has been collated to illustrate Elvis Presley’s artistry and his contribution to the arts. Linda Ann McConnell’s debut film, Elvis, How Great Thou Art premiered to a standing ovation at the Glasgow Film Theatre in Scotland on the 29th anniversary of Elvis’ death on the 16th Aug 2006. The film is now available for hiring. Read full press release (News, Source: Linda Ann Connell)


'The Real Failure of Elvis' movie career': All Elvis' movies made profit. Amongst the music-travelogues were some strong dramatic roles demonstrating Elvis' acting potential. So what went wrong? Is The Colonel to blame or did Elvis misunderstand the demands of the film industry? In this fascinating article, EIN contributor Harley Payette investigates whether Elvis really could have been 'a contender'. (Spotlight/Celluloid Elvis, Source: EIN August 2006)


"Altered By Elvis" makes West Coast Premier at '7th Annual Mods and Rockers Film Festival'

 

Read the press release


Elvis film & documentary screenings in Los Angeles during August: The American Cinematheque presents a salute to Sand, Surf and Elvis onscreen, August 5 - 16 at the Egyptian Theatre and August 19 - 20 at the Aero Theatre as part of Mods and Rockers 2006. Read full media release & film details (News, Source: American Cinematheque, 3 Aug 2006)

A FUN and educational online film appreciation course run over 8 to 12 weeks

Enrolments now closed for the 2006 semester

Most film critics view Elvis' body of film work as one-dimensional pop celluloid, a group of inconsequential, fluffy 'B' grade movies with Elvis singing a dozen songs to a dozen pretty girls in a dozen different exotic locales.  This description is an unfortunate misrepresentation of what Elvis celluloid is about. 

Despite what some film critics would have you believe, we cannot summarily regard Jailhouse Rock as equivalent to Blue Hawaii as equivalent to Live A Little, Love A Little, and so on. They may share some filmic similarities, but they are also structurally and politically, very different films.
There were, in fact, four distinct phases in Elvis' film career, each with its own set of narrative structure, recurring themes, and political intonations.

Since the early 1970s, and regularly since 1990, EIN has offered its popular film theory course, both in class and online, based around Elvis' film career. 

Using basic film concepts, the course illuminates the four phases of Elvis' film career, identifying how each phase differs fundamentally from its predecessor, and how Elvis' film work is rich in a set of underlying political intentions or influences, and recurring motifs (themes), many of which relate to Elvis' real life story. 

Why not join us on an exciting journey of discovery over the next three months as we explore what Elvis movies are really all about, and how the filmmaker has deliberately designed each film to influence our perceptions of Elvis and the world around him.

We promise that after completing the course you will never again view an Elvis film (or your favorite TV program) in the same way!

What you will get out of "New Perspectives in Elvis Cinema":

  • an understanding of basic film concepts (including narrative structure; camera techniques; editing; role of incidental music, etc)
  • the ability to identify how the film maker has set out to communicate with & influence the audience, an ability you will be able to apply to any film or TV work (go ahead and amaze your friends!)
  • gain a new level of appreciation & understanding about Elvis' diverse body of film work
  • be able to identify recurring “themes & “texts” in Elvis’ films
  • get to watch Elvis movies and learn at the same time
  • have a lot of FUN!
  • receive a "certificate" suitable for framing at the conclusion of the course

Click for more information about the course


Act Naturally: Elvis Presley, the Beatles and "rocksploitation.": EIN recently came across this erudite analysis of Elvis and Beatles films. It is an excellent article going way beyond the usual surface analysis of the Elvis' body of film work. (Source: Screening The Past, 23 May 2006)


Coming Soon - Elvis Film Course 2006: Enrolments will shortly open for the 2006 semester of EIN's popular online Elvis Film Course. Originating at the ANU Film Group, the course has been attended in class and online by more than 100 participants. The course uses basic film theory to examine the structure, narrative and film techniques used in Elvis' body of film work. The skills gained from the course can be applied to any film or television program and give one a new dimension on which to enjoy what is being viewed, and understand what the director/producer was intending to achieve, and how he/she wanted to influence the audience. More details shortly. (22 May 2006 )

New movie, "The King": While it is called 'The King' and its main character is named Elvis, we don't think it has anything to do with Elvis Presley. This is the film synopsis:

Elvis Valderez is a twenty-one year old dreamer who has just been honorably discharged from the US Navy. With his duffle bag and rifle, he travels back to his hometown of Corpus Christi Texas, where he intends to seek out his father--a man he has only heard about from his Mexican mother, who has since passed away. Elvis quickly discovers that his father, David Sandow, is now the pastor of a thriving Baptist church, and has a family of his own--a beautiful wife, Twyla, and two picture-perfect children, Malerie and Paul. While seeking out his father at church, Elvis unwittingly strikes up a conversation with sixteen-year old Malerie and there's an immediate, unspoken attraction between them. Elvis then waits for his father after church and follows him and his family to their suburban neighborhood, where he approaches David in front of their Norman Rockwell style home. The encounter is brief. David wants nothing to do with Elvis, who is an uncomfortable reminder of his own wayward past and a well-kept secret from his children and his parishioners. Rejected, Elvis resolves to leave this happy family to themselves. However, Elvis can't shake the image of Malerie, his half sister, and can't stop himself from befriending her. The relationship soon develops into something romantic and natural taboos are quickly discarded. Through his courtship of Malerie, Elvis begins to slowly infiltrate the family, thus setting the stage for the unleashing of violence and a tragedy of biblical proportions. (Source: Amber Smith, 11 May 2006)


Elvis: Frame By Frame: With Douglas Brode's 'Elvis Cinema & Popular Culture' due for release on 30 June 2006 comes word of another serious look at Elvis' film career. Bill Bram, who wrote the text for the JAT publication "Elvis Presley As The One Called Charro", is searching for a publisher for "Elvis: Frame By Frame".

From the author's website: Hundreds of books have been published since Elvis Presley’s death yet none have seriously documented the making of his films. Elvis spent more than half of his career making films, yet this critical time period has been essentially ignored by most biographers. This book investigates the making of nine of his films, in the words of those that worked on and co-starred in them. The author spared no expense to locate and interview hundreds of people who worked on Elvis's films, including co-stars, movie crew members, dancers, extras and stuntmen. Anecdotes and fascinating behind the scene accounts will be the central focus.

A large portion of the book will consist of direct quotations from the interviewees, edited to create an interesting narrative of each film. It is a running commentary on Elvis’s films. In addition the book will contain information obtained directly from the movie files. Decades old questions regarding particular scenes and songs, believed to have been filmed, will be addressed and answered. Readers will find chapters on King Creole, Kid Galahad, Roustabout, Double Trouble, and Live A Little, Love A Little among others. The book concludes with a fascinating chapter on the Elvis movie that should have been: A Star Is Born.

Rare behind the scene movie photographs will be interspersed through out the book, never published, and obtained by the author. In addition, the author scouted and found dozens of locations, in and around Los Angeles, used in Elvis’s films. Elvis: Frame By Frame will be the first book to present a detailed account into the making of Elvis’s films. Most importantly, the book offers a new perspective and understanding of the most fascinating entertainer of our time. (News, Source: Elvis: Frame By Frame / Elvis News, 7 May 2006)


"Elvis The Documentaries CD": Details of the CD accompanying the upcoming Joseph Tunzi book of the same name have been released. 'From the archives, 36 tracks from That s The Way It Is & Elvis On Tour.

Go behind closed doors and listen to the man himself! A collection as never before! For the first time a complete cd is dedicated to both documentaries!

All the tracks are remastered! With 16 page full-colour booklet!!! A collection of photos and memorabilia from 1970 & 1972. Beautiful picture disc edition! This is an EFE Promo release / limited to 500 copies worldwide!

 

THAT S THE WAY IT IS: 1 · Rehearsing I Just Can t Help Believing (August 10, 1970 · Las Vegas); 2 · Are You Horny Tonight? (July 29, 1970 · MGM Studios, Culver City, CA.); 3 · Rehearsing Polk Salad Annie (August 7, 1970 · Las Vegas Showroom rehearsal); 4 · Eating Hamburgers (July 14, 1970 · Los Angeles, CA.); 5 · Rehearsing Sweet Caroline (July 14, 1970 · Los Angeles, CA.); 6 · Rehearsing Mary In The Morning (August 7, 1970 · Las Vegas Showroom rehearsal); 7 · Dialogue (August 7, 1970 · Las Vegas Showroom rehearsal) ; 8 · Rehearsing I ll Take You Home Again Kathleen (August 7, 1970 · Las Vegas Showroom rehearsal); 9 · Rehearsal excerpt #2 (August 7, 1970 · Las Vegas); 10 · Don t It Make You Wanna Go Home (July 29, 1970 · MGM Studios, Culver City, CA.); 11 · Nerves (August 10, 1970 · Las Vegas); 12 · Reading Telegrams before opening show (August 10, 1970 · Las Vegas) ; 13 · Talking and singing backstage before opening show (August 10, 1970 · Las Vegas)

ELVIS ON TOUR: 14 · Opening scene Elvis On Tour (1972 · From The Movie) ; 15 · A conversation with Elvis about Elvis On Tour; 16 · El Paso (March 30 · Rehearsal excerpt ); 17 · Backstage Discussion (April 15, 1972 · Macon, GA); 18 · Denise Sanchez meets Elvis (April 19, 1972 · Albuquerque, NM.); 19 · Dressing Room Conversation (April 1972) ; 20 · Elvis and co-producer/director Bob Abel talking about The Wild Early Years 21 · Entertaining Fans 22 · Assembling Singers And Musicains; 23 · Live Performances 24 · Jaycee Awards Speech 25 · First Talent Contest ; 26 · His Famous Sideburns 27 · Humes High Annual Minstrel Show, 1953; 28 · Driving A Truck And Sun Records 29 · From The Waist Up 30 · Jealousy And ; Acceptance 31 · Trapped In Hollywood 32 · His Entourage 33 · Tour Preparation; 34 · Film Title Revelation (April 1972); 35 · Little Rock Concert Promotor Interview (April 1972)

SPECIAL BONUS: 36 · RIAA Gold Records presentation (August 1972 · At Elvis Dressing Room, Las Vegas)' (Source: FECC, 6 May 2006)


"The Truth About Elvis" documentary: Elvis Presley died in 1977, right? That's the official story. But some people say they've seen Presley alive years after he supposedly was put to rest on the grounds of his Graceland estate in Memphis, Tenn. He must have gotten tired of being the king of rock 'n' roll and faked his death, some surmise. Perhaps he took up residence in a smallish Midwestern town with a funny name.

Director Adam Muskiewicz and producer Dan Bliss were in Kalamazoo recently to do interviews for their documentary "The Truth About Elvis.''

"We're very excited about our interviews here. We've always known that Memphis, Vegas and Kalamazoo were our keystone cities'' for the mythology surrounding the legendary musician, Muskiewicz said Wednesday.

In the spring of 1988, the supermarket tabloid Weekly World News printed a story that Elvis had been spotted in a Kalamazoo Burger King restaurant. Gazette reporter Tom Haroldson wrote about the sighting report that May. He found the woman quoted in the tabloid story, Louise Welling, of Vicksburg, who said she had seen Elvis at a Vicksburg grocery; she said it was her daughter who had seen Elvis at the Burger King.

The story, former Gazette Editor James R. Mosby Jr. said Wednesday, then ``took on a life of its own, and it took off not only around the country but around the world.'' The Gazette story moved on the Associated Press wire and made its way into newspapers such as the New York Times. ``Then suddenly one day Haroldson's getting phone calls from the BBC (British Broadcasting Corp.) wanting to interview him,'' Mosby said.

On Wednesday morning, Muskiewicz interviewed Mosby and Kalamazoo Mayor Hannah McKinney on camera. He interviewed Welling later on Wednesday and Haroldson on Thursday. Before meeting the filmmakers, Mosby suspected the film might be a spoof. ``I thought they were going to do a put-on or put-down of the whole thing, or of Kalamazoo, but it didn't appear that way at all. They appeared to be very much into the Elvis thing, and very much into why there's this myth that keeps popping up and bouncing around almost 30 years after he died.''

Muskiewicz, an actor from Cleveland who has been in independent films, teamed in 2004 with Bliss, a producer of poker DVDs in Los Angeles, to look into the Elvis mystery. Muskiewicz said he thought, after hearing stories of Elvis still walking the earth, that it would be a great documentary subject, but only if filmmakers approached it seriously.

"There is nothing poking fun or making fun of anybody in this movie at all,'' Muskiewicz said.

Welling's story had Muskiewicz wondering about Elvis, who would be 71 years old today, after he spoke with her Wednesday. After 18 years, he said, "she's absolutely sure'' she saw Elvis at the checkout lane of the Vicksburg Harding's store, now a Felpausch store. Muskiewicz said he asked her how she knew it was Elvis. `"Obviously it was 10 or 11 years after Elvis had died, so presumably his appearance would've changed a little bit,'' he said. "She made it clear, like so many people have said, when you're next to Elvis you know, simply because the man had an aura about him.''

Muskiewicz said he hopes to have "The Truth About Elvis'' ready for a premiere on Aug. 16, 2007 -- the 30th anniversary of Elvis' official date of death. In the meantime, he will keep looking for evidence and stories and would like those who believe they have seen Elvis to contact him at www.truthabout-elvis.com. (Source: Adam Muskiewicz, 5 May 2006)


“This Is Elvis” is being revised, re-mastered and dramatically improved: Some great news from Elvisly Yours and Sid Shaw: "Through our contacts in the film industry we have been advised “This is Elvis” is to have a whole new makeover, just like the Special Edition of “That’s the Way It Is”. This is a major project and will be available for theatrical release in 2007, as well as eventual release on DVD. Out will go a lot of the early film footage with the Elvis look-alikes and be replaced with more emphasis on the real Elvis and more music.

I have always believed “This is Elvis” has been the best documentary on the life of Elvis Presley and with all the new technology available today dramatic improvements can be made to a lot of Elvis film footage. It is now 25 years since “This is Elvis” hit the screens around the world. It never did well in the cinemas and lost money in many countries because it did not receive much promotional support at the time. But, in Australia it made a good profit. I am sure the new “This is Elvis” will be a great improvement on the original that in itself is a classic in the Elvis World." (Source: Sid Shaw, 28 April 2006)


"Elvis Cinema & Popular Culture" book delay: Release of what is expected to be one of 2006's best Elvis book releases, Elvis Cinema & Popular Culture by Douglas Brode, has been delayed three months until 30 June 2006. (News, Source: ElvisBookResearch, 4 April 2006)


Bubba Ho-Tep prequel back on track: Don Coscarelli, director of the great little genre hybrid Bubba Ho-tep, has revealed that the oft-discussed sequel to that elderly-Elvis-vs.-a-mummy picture may be back on track. Bubba Nosferatu, a prequel to Bubba Ho-tep, seemed to be dead in the water after a series of setbacks, but now things are looking up for the Elvis/vampire tale.

"I'm putting a big effort into doing Bubba Nosferatu now," Coscarelli tells Sci Fi Wire. "The project has a life of its own. ... People seem to want it. We just have to get it finished. The whole idea of Bubba Nosferatu was a joke."

What the filmmaker means by that is that the idea of the sequel started with a throwaway end credit in Bubba Ho-tep that promised a follow-up film called Bubba Nosferatu: The Curse of the She-Vampire.

But the fanboys have made that film a reality now, it seems. Coscarelli is working on the script for the film with Joe R. Lansdale, who penned the original short story. The film will portray a younger, thirtysomething Elvis, and the director says that the original film's star Bruce Campbell "can't wait to put his Elvis jumpsuit back on again." And beyond that? Coscarelli hints that a third film isn't out of the question, and he even goes so far as to give it a name: Bubba Sasquatch. (News, Source: nowplayingmag)

Click to read EIN's review of "Bubba Ho-tep"


New book due out tomorrow - "Elvis Cinema and Popular Culture": Douglas Brode's highly anticipated release about Elvis' body of film work is due for release in the US tomorrow by McFarland & Co. It is available to buy through Amazon and is described as:

Though Elvis Presley’s music is widely credited as starting a sea change in American popular culture, his films are often dismissed as base marketing vehicles, commercially successful but insignificant.

Beyond the formulaic plotlines and increasing reliance on weak songs, however, the films—and Elvis—serve as profound cultural touchstones, revealing changing American aesthetics more than a changing Elvis. Elvis’s rebel image in 1956, as a guitar-swinging incarnation of Brando or Dean, had by 1969’s Change of Habit become safe and sterile.

This work demonstrates how Elvis, through his films, reflected a shifting social, cultural and political landscape in America. Encompassing all 31 movies and two 1970s documentaries, it provides a film-by-film study of Elvis Presley and America, and argues that each film reflects the society for which it was made. Throughout his career, most of Elvis’s characters combined rebellion with wholesome, traditional ideals, but the public’s perspective changed, and what was considered radical in 1954 was called reactionary by 1970. Studied sequentially, his films reflect those cyclical ideals, and unconsciously portray America’s process of renewal and redefinition of self.

About the author: Douglas Brode is the author of more than twenty books on the visual and performing arts. A professor of film history at Syracuse University, he lives in Phoenix, New York. (News, Source: McFarland & Co., 29 March 2006)

(Update: Publication of 'Elvis Cinema' delayed until late June 2006)


"Elvis at the Movies": It looks as if April will be another busy month for ElvisMatters. After the kick off of “Elvis – Behind the Scenes” (with Dean Nichopoulis on April 14th in Holland and the 15th in Belgium), the EM-crew presents a unique project on Friday April 21st: “Elvis at the Movies”, with an exclusive expo as main attraction. The expo focuses on the movie years, with original Elvis-outfits and dozens of rare movie posters. Guest of honor is Jos Clauwers, who stood in for Elvis in “Double Trouble” during the shooting in Belgium. For more info: see the Events section. (News, Source: Elvis Matters / Elvis News, 11 March 2006)

The man behind "The Elvis Killers": A little known film release is 'The Elvis Killers'. We came across some information regarding its creator, Terry King (opposite):

Terry King has been involved in the creative process of acting since the age of seven when he played Huckelberry Finn in a school play. Since then, he took school courses in acting and performed in drama and Shakepeare festivals, playing such characters as MacBeth, Othello, and Sweeny Todd.

Leads in school plays such as "And They Dance Real Slow in Jackson" and "A Gap in Generations" were followed by professional acting classes. Holding a bachelor's degree in Radio-TV-Film from California State University Northridge and majoring in Film Production and Media Theory, King wrote and/or directed two short films in college, also acting as the leading man.

Attracted to difficult-to-play characters, King played an illiterate orderlyin one film and a deaf mute in the other. Writing a few unproduced scripts, the first Atkins/King collaboration startedwhen King brought "The Elvis Killers" to low-budget full-featureproduction as writer, producer, director, editor, actor, etc. Atkins supplied his music, editing, and acting talents to help bring "The Elvis Killers" to completion. King returned the favor by supplying acting chops for Atkins' "Eat the Rich", leading to their first full collaboration,"Grip". And Overlook Pictures was born.


Time to release these Elvis films: With most of Elvis' 33 movies already released on DVD it is time the remaining titles were issued:

  • Girl Happy (MGM)
  • Tickle Me (Allied Artists)
  • Live A Little, Love A Little (MGM)
  • Elvis On Tour (MGM)

Distributors should also release "This Is Elvis" (Warner Bros) and the early Diane Lane film, "Touched By Love", aka "To Elvis, With Love" (distributor unknown). A high quality release of "Charro" on DVD is also needed. While many fans have these titles on DVDR, official releases, preferably as Special Editions, are long overdue. (Celluloid/EIN comment, 25 Jan 2006)


DVD release - Elvis Meets Nixon (1997): This 'mockumentary' was released as a budget priced DVD in the EC in early 2006.

Film details:
Starring: Rick Peters, Bob Gunton
Director: Allan Arkush
Synopsis: Mockumentary details three-day journey Presley actually embarked on from Memphis to D.C. because he wanted Nixon to make him Federal Agent at Large to warn youth about dangers of drugs.
Runtime: 99 minutes

MPAA Rating: Not Rated
Genre: Comedy

Region: 2

Available from: Amazon.co.uk

Cast:
Rick Peters
Bob Gunton
Jackie Burroughs
Curtis Armstrong
Gabriel Hogan
Kevin McCarthy
Tony Curtis
Graham Nash
Wayne Newton (Source: EIN, Jan 2006)

 

2005

"Love Me Tender" in color: A colorised edition of Elvis' first film, Love Me Tender, is being sold on ebay and through several Elvis dealers, including the Chongenki Shop. (Oct 2005)


'A Kick Upwards For Elvis' Movies': Do you wonder why real Elvis fans sometimes go along with the common perception that "All of Elvis' Movies were bad"? Of course they weren't all great but surely Bruce Willis, Burt Reynolds and other recognized actors have made far, far worse & survive with a better reputation? Harley Payette investigates & checks out the good and the bad. (Celluloid Elvis/Spotlight Article, Source: EIN)

Elvis Film Guide: We have updated our detailed look at Elvis' film career including reviews, film ratings and movie trivia. (Spotlight/Celluloid Elvis; Source: EIN, Nov 2001/March 2005)

Elvis film biography: We found this short biography of Elvis' film career in our archives. (Spotlight/Article/Celluloid Elvis, Source: Jason Ankeny, All Movie Guide)


Enrolments now open - The Elvis Film Course: Ever wanted to study Elvis as a subject? Well here's your chance. Enrolments are now open for The Elvis Film Course, a fun and information packed look at filmmaking through Elvis' movies. You'll never look at a film or TV show the same way again! (Celluloid Elvis/News, Source: EIN, Nov 2004)

The Elvis Film: Star Vehicle or 'B' Grade Celluloid: offers fans around the world the chance to undertake a fun learning experience that will change the way you view not only Elvis' films but films in general.


The Elvis Film Legacy: 'B' Grade Formula Celluloid - Truth or Myth? - originally published as part of the First Online Symposium on Elvis Aron Presley, this paper takes a critical look at how Elvis' film work is often unfairly maligned.


The Colonel and Me Update: Barry Levinson is set to direct The Colonel and Me, a Warner Bros film about the mentoring influence that Elvis Presley manager Colonel Tom Parker had on Elvis. producer Jerry Weintraub. Bo Goldman (Scent of a Woman) is writing the script and Weintraub is producing. Director: Barry Levinson (20 May 2003)


Elvis Film Fact - "Tickle Me": Elvis made this film in a deal with the floundering Allied Artists which saw him take a pay cut and not record any new material in exchange for 50% of the film's profits. The film was a big earner, which is credited in saving Allied Artists from bankruptcy.

 

Film/DVD Reviews

Controversial new Dakota Fanning movie "hounddog": EIN recently watched a "screener" copy of the highly controversial fim, hounddog.  Starring child actor Dakota Fanning and Robin Wright Penn the film tells the story of a troubled young girl, Lewellyn (Fanning) who finds solace through music, particularly Elvis music. The Elvis sub-theme is an important one.
 
The film certainly will not be to everyone's taste.  It features several strong scenes including Lewellyn dancing naked and appearing in only her underwear. However the scene which has caused particular controversy is one where Lewellyn is raped.  Given the sensitive issues around it, the scene is well done with careful scripting and direction. It is not as explicit as some critics suggest.
 
The lead actors all turn in strong performances with Fanning's portrayal of troubled Lewellyn showing maturity beyond her years.  The film also features first rate cinematography. hounddog was produced and directed by Deborah Kampmeier.
 
Due to the controversy around hounddog its general release to cinema (and/or DVD) is still to be announced. 

In the US, religious groups protested about the film and politicians (notably North Carolina State Senator, Phil Berger) have also expressed concerns about its content.  The controversy mirrors that once aroused for the Jodie Foster film, Taxi Driver.

Strangely, a similarly powerful and more explicit rape scene of a young black girl in the film adaptation of the John Grisham novel, A Time To Kill, did not meet with any discernable outcry.  This raises a number of questions based around race and increasing conservatism in America today.

Critically acclaimed when shown at this year's Sundance Festival, it is unfortunate that a number of controversial scenes have overshadowed the film as a whole. 

While not the best of its type, hounddog is generally well crafted, but lacks sufficient plot exposition and direction to fully engage the viewer.  Overall, it is a missed opportunity to deal with the issue of serious child abuse. From Full Moon Films, Hand Picked Films, Intandem Films. Running time: 98 minutes. (Film Review, Source: EIN, Oct 2007)

Comment on this review


"Elvis' Grave" (DVD Review): One of Elvis world's most obscure films is now available on DVD....Elvis' Grave.

Blending elements from the infamous Texas Chainsaw Massacre and classic Rocky Horror Picture Show, the plot of this low budget feature is described as:

"A Chainsaw wielding, psycho-impersonator from hell -- on a conquest tour of terror!"

Read EIN's full review of this offbeat 'B' grade film, a film with a scorching rock 'n' roll soundtrack...but does it live up to its pr as a "Southern Gothic Musical"...or is it something even more sinister?

Rated NR for Nauseating Repulsive, this is a film which gives new meaning to the ETA phenomenon!! Blair Witch cohorts...move over! (Source: EIN, Sep 2007)


"Viva Las Vegas" DVD Review: Elvis movies aren't for everyone. They're cheesy, and they have flimsy plots. Even Colonel Parker viewed them as primarily moneymaking endeavors.

That said, they have plenty of adoring fans and, well, who doesn't want the pure escapism of a movie like Viva Las Vegas from time to time?

Read full review (Source: DVD Verdict, Sep 2007)


"Protecting The King" (DVD Review): EIN's Nigel Patterson recently warmed up his home theater to view David Stanley's directorial film debut, "Protecting The King". It is the story of Stanley's coming of age, his loss of innocence after becoming one of the King's bodyguards while still a teenager.

With a mixed emotional element but several very powerful scenes and flashes of important insight, "Protecting The King" proves to be a strong directorial debut by Stanley.

At times the film has a brutally frank edge, and this is unlikely to endear it to some fans. However, it will have merit for those wishing to better understand life around Elvis with its incredible pressures and temptations; and for fans interested in exploring the human frailties and weaknesses which often afflict those thrust into such a surreal existence. (Source: EIN, Sep 2007)

Read EIN's full review


Rare "underground" Elvis film: EIN takes a look back at "Evil Elvis Christmas", one of the rarest Elvis related films ever made. As an underground "slasher" movie with numerous Elvis world references and liberal doses of humor and blood and gore, "Evil Elvis Christmas" is a very different type of Elvis related film. (Source: EIN, November 2006)

Elvis 'film festival' review

(Source: LA Weekly.com, 21 Sep 2006)

 


"Altered By Elvis" (Film Review): What is an Elvis fan? The answer to this question is as diverse as the ever changing, colorful images in a kaleidoscope. EIN recently viewed the critically acclaimed film about a cross-section of Elvis fans, "Altered By Elvis".

What we found was thought provoking, comforting and confronting! Step inside "Altered By Elvis" in EIN's detailed review of a rich and disturbingly challenging film which offers a multi-layered perspective on the cult of celebrity and some of those those who inhabit it. (Film Review, Source: EIN, 12 July 2006)


Quirky Elvis comedy opens in Australia today: With Bubba Ho-Tep (Elvis vs. The Mummy) opening nationally in Australia today, The Courier-Mail took a look inside the quirky, off-beat comedy. (Review, Source: Courier-Mail, 24 Feb 2005)


Elvis Has Left The Building: EIN takes a critical look at Kim Basinger's recent film which uses an intriguing basic premise but suffers from inconsistency in its comedic content and ultimately is flawed, despite a pleasing finale and a very strong soundtrack. (DVD Review, Source: EIN)

This Is Elvis "unofficial DVD" review: With news of an official release on DVD of This is Elvis now effectively 'missing in action', EIN looks at a number of the unofficial releases of both the short and long versions of what is often referred to as the 34th Elvis film. (DVD Review, Source: EIN)

Follow That Dream (MGM): solid audio-visual transfer and sound production values bring to life, lively rib-tickling, family film. And Elvis gets to act as well!


Spinout: EIN's guest reviewer, Bill Treadway, gives a unique view on one of The King's mid-60's travelogues.


Bubba Ho-Tep: Senior citizen, Elvis The King vs. The King of the Dead. EIN reviews a great new comedy-horror movie starring Bruce Campbell as Elvis and Ossie Davis as a "black" JFK.


Heartbreak Hotel: nearly forgotten Elvis related film from 1988 is a comic, musical and entertainment treat for the whole family.


Kid Galahad packs a punch!: EIN casts a critical eye over MGM's latest Elvis DVD release.


Film review: Spinout

DVD Review: King Creole

DVD Review: G. I. Blues

DVD Review: Blue Hawaii

DVD Review: Roustabout

DVD Review: Girls! Girls! Girls!

DVD Review: Fun In Acapulco

DVD Review: Paradise, Hawaiian Style

DVD Review: Easy Come, Easy Go

DVD Review: Kid Galahad

DVD Review: This Is Elvis


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did you miss?
"Charro" Film Review
June is "Elvis Film Month"on EIN
Interview: Definitive Ernst Jorgensen (2002)
Spotlight: Single disc releases of Comeback Special & Aloha
 
Reviews
FTD: Made In Memphis
CD: 'Hail To The King' (MOJO)
Magazine: MOJO
Book: Elvis Through My Eyes (Denson)
DVD: Love Me Tender (Special Edition)
CD: Inspirational (genre album)
CD: Elvis Country (genre album)
DVD: Kraig Parker - 50th Anniversary Tribute
CD: Pieces Of My Life
CD: Elvis rock
DVD: Behind the Scenes at the Seattle World's Fair
DVD: The TCB Gang - The Way It Was
CD: In The King's Shadow..The Rock 'n' Roll Years (El Gamble)
Book: Inside Loving You
FTD: Loving You
FTD: Southern Nights
DVD: "Promised Land" (Steve Preston)
DVD: Colonel Parker
Film: Elvis Killed My Brother
CD: Elvis A Legendary Performer Vol. 7
DVD: A Tribute To The King (Scotty Moore)
Book/CD: Memphis Recording Service
Book: Elvis and the Memphis Mafia
CD: All Shook Up (reggae tribute)
'Elvis On Tour Outtakes' DVD review
'Hitstory' CD EIN in depth review
FTD: Summer Festival
DVD: Elvis & Me
FTD: All Shook Up
FTD: Tickle Me
CD: Elvis by the Presleys
Book: Dewey and Elvis
Latest Articles
The King has rebel roots
Elvis in Tucson
Elvis helps bring peace to Afghanistan
Elvis & Tupelo
Act Naturally: Elvis, the Beatles and "rocksploitation"
Is Elvis alive?: Major investigation identifies flaw in 'Elvis DNA findings'
"David vs. Goliath": Sid Shaw's legal battle with EPE
Elvis' blackest day on stage
Elvis' musical legacy - 'A Complete Body Of Work
The Best Elvis CDs, Books & DVDs ever released!
Elvis & the Mexican Bracero
Tribute to Charlie Hodge
The Top 10 Elvis releases of 2005
Wilson Pickett & Elvis
Elvis That's The Way It Is: 1970 vs. 2001
Elvis' Bad Break!
The amazing story of Jimmy (Orion) Ellis
Graceland 2005
Elvis and Las Vegas
The man who bought Elvis (Robert Sillerman)
Presley Commission Report
Mario Lanza meets Elvis
A Kick Upwards For Elvis' Movies
How Mario Lanza influenced Elvis
Enduring economic power of Elvis
Graceland - the ultimate bachelor pad
Elvis was not a racist!
The Definitive Elvis "blues" album
Elvis on The Creative Edge - Part 2 - The CD
'Elvis Seriously'- Why is Elvis' voice too often ignored
Elvis & Ed Sullivan - The Real Story
It's Over - Gordon Minto on 18 #1's
Elvis - symbol of freedom or not?
The importance of being Elvis
Elvis rules on television! (updated August 2005)
Elvis in the 50s - Maxine Brown
How & where to sell your Elvis collection
Elvis in the 1970s
More on Elvis on TV
Elvis - Hero with 1000 faces
Elvis Film Guide
Elvis rules on television! (updated May 2005)
How did Elvis die?
 
Latest Interviews
Rev. Mother Dolores Hart
David Stanley talks to EIN
Charlie Hodge talks to EIN
Kevan Budd (BMG)
Ernst Jorgensen on Elvis' record sales
Billy Smith (Part 2)
Billy Smith (Part 1)
Ernst Jorgensen (Sirius Radio)
Lamar Fike (Part 2)
Lamar Fike (Part 1)
Marty Lacker (part 2)
Marty Lacker (part 1)
David Bendeth, producer of 'Elvis 30#1s'
Ernst Jorgensen
Ernst Jorgensen
 
Audio-visual
Elvis Only Radio
Elvis On Tour (Hampton Roads) footage
Elvis On Tour
Graceland cam
Listen to the Elvis "strung out" in Vegas audio
The "Real" Elvis off-stage
Unreleased Elvis audio now online
View EPE Graceland tourism ads
View video of "All Shook Up" opening night on Broadway
"Images In Concert" Photo Database
 
Reference
All about Elvis
All about Elvis tribute artists
All about Lisa Presley
All about Graceland
Contact List
Elvis CDs in 2006
Elvis DVDs 2006
Elvis books 2005-07
Elvis Week 2007
Elvis film guide
Elvis Online Virtual Library
Elvis Presley Research Forum
Elvis was a racist? (archives)
Elvis Week 2005
Links to Elvis' family & friends
Online Elvis Symposium
Sale of EPE "Archives"
6th Elvis Website Survey
Spotlight on The King
"Wikipedia" Elvis bio
 
 

Quote:

"Elvis Presley is the supreme socio-cultural icon in the history of pop culture"

(Dr. Gary Enders)


Quote:

"Elvis is the 'glue' which holds our society together....which subconciously gives our world meaning"

(Anonymous)


Quote:

"Eventually everybody has to die, except Elvis"

(humorist Dave Barry)


Quote:

"He is the "Big Bang", and the universe he detonated is still expanding, the pieces are still flying"

(Greil Marcus, "Dead Elvis")


Quote:"I think Elvis Presley will never be solved"

(Nick Tosches)


Quote:

"He was the most popular man that ever walked on this planet since Christ himself was here"

(Carl Perkins)


Quote:

"When I first heard Elvis' voice I just knew I wasn't going to work for anybody...hearing him for the first time was like busting out of jail"

(Bob Dylan)


Quote:

"When we were kids growing up in Liverpool, all we ever wanted was to be Elvis Presley"

(Sir Paul McCartney)


Quote:"You can't say enough good things about Elvis. He was one of a kind"

(Johnny Cash)


Quote:

"And don't think for one moment he's just a passing fancy....he's got enough of it to keep him on top for a long time"

(R. Fred Arnold, Fury magazine, Aug 1957)


Quote:

"It isn't enough to say that Elvis is kind to his parents, sends money home, and is the same unspoiled kid he was before all the commotion began. That still isn't a free ticket to behave like a sex maniac in public"

(Eddie Condon, Cosmopolitan)


Elvis records reaching #2 & #3 on the Cashbox Pop Singles chart:

#2: A Fool Such As I (1959)

#2: A Big Hunk Of Love (1959)

#3: Hard Headed Woman (1958)

#3: One Night (1958)

#3: (You're The Devil) In Disguise (1963)


Elvis Facts:

Tickets for Elvis' show on March 29, 1957 in St. Louis cost $2.00 to $2.50

While in Germany Elvis was hospitalised with tonsillitis in October 1959

Despite being an illegal immigrant, photographic evidence shows Colonel Tom Parker traveled to Canada with Elvis in 1957

Elvis strongly believed there weren't enough good songs in King Creole to justify releasing a soundtrack album. RCA initially agreed, releasing two very successful EPs from the movie. A soundtrack LP eventually followed

During the 1960s Elvis had his own football team, Elvis Presley Enterprises, which played in the Memphis touch football league.

In the 1962 final, EPE narrowly lost to Delta Automatic Transmission, 6-13In Clambake, (Elvis) Scott Hayward's driving licence shows February 23, 1940...taking 5 years off Elvis' real age

In the 1970s Elvis was offered $5m to stage a concert in front of the Pyramids in Egypt. When the Colonel declined the offer, Saudi billionaires raised the offer to $10m